HOXC4

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Identifiers
Aliases
External IDsGeneCards: [1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
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RefSeq (mRNA)

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RefSeq (protein)

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Homeobox protein Hox-C4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HOXC4 gene.[1][2][3]

Function

This gene belongs to the homeobox family of genes. The homeobox genes encode a highly conserved family of transcription factors that play an important role in morphogenesis in all multicellular organisms. Mammals possess four similar homeobox gene clusters, HOXA, HOXB, HOXC and HOXD, which are located on different chromosomes and consist of 9 to 11 genes arranged in tandem. This gene, HOXC4, is one of several homeobox HOXC genes located in a cluster on chromosome 12. Three genes, HOXC5, HOXC4 and HOXC6, share a 5' non-coding exon. Transcripts may include the shared exon spliced to the gene-specific exons, or they may include only the gene-specific exons. Two alternatively spliced variants that encode the same protein have been described for HOXC4. Transcript variant one includes the shared exon, and transcript variant two includes only gene-specific exons.[3]

See also

Interactions

HOXC4 has been shown to interact with Ku70.[4]

References

  1. McAlpine PJ, Shows TB (Aug 1990). "Nomenclature for human homeobox genes". Genomics. 7 (3): 460. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(90)90186-X. PMID 1973146.
  2. Scott MP (Dec 1992). "Vertebrate homeobox gene nomenclature". Cell. 71 (4): 551–3. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(92)90588-4. PMID 1358459.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Entrez Gene: HOXC4 homeobox C4".
  4. Schild-Poulter C, Pope L, Giffin W, Kochan JC, Ngsee JK, Traykova-Andonova M, Haché RJ (May 2001). "The binding of Ku antigen to homeodomain proteins promotes their phosphorylation by DNA-dependent protein kinase". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (20): 16848–56. doi:10.1074/jbc.M100768200. PMID 11279128.

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.




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