Adrenocortical carcinoma risk factors

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmad Al Maradni, M.D. [2] Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[3]

Overview

The most important risk factors for developing adrenocortical cancer are Lynch syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, Carney complex, Neurofibromatosis type 1, Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and Carney complex.

Risk Factors

Risk factors associated with adrenocortical carcinoma are:

Differential Diagnosis Gene mutations Clinical picture
Lynch syndrome[1]
Neurofibromatosis type 1 [4]
MEN1[5]
  • MENIN
Carney complex[3]
BWS[2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Carethers JM, Stoffel EM (2015). "Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer.". World J Gastroenterol. 21 (31): 9253–61. PMC 4541378Freely accessible. PMID 26309352. doi:10.3748/wjg.v21.i31.9253. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 H. Segers, R. Kersseboom, M. Alders, R. Pieters, A. Wagner & M. M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (2012). "Frequency of WT1 and 11p15 constitutional aberrations and phenotypic correlation in childhood Wilms tumour patients". European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990). 48 (17): 3249–3256. PMID 22796116. doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2012.06.008.  Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 Correa R, Salpea P, Stratakis CA (2015). "Carney complex: an update.". Eur J Endocrinol. 173 (4): M85–97. PMC 4553126Freely accessible. PMID 26130139. doi:10.1530/EJE-15-0209. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Hirbe AC, Gutmann DH (2014). "Neurofibromatosis type 1: a multidisciplinary approach to care.". Lancet Neurol. 13 (8): 834–43. PMID 25030515. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70063-8. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 B. Gatta-Cherifi, O. Chabre, A. Murat, P. Niccoli, C. Cardot-Bauters, V. Rohmer, J. Young, B. Delemer, H. Du Boullay, M. F. Verger, J. M. Kuhn, J. L. Sadoul, Ph Ruszniewski, A. Beckers, M. Monsaingeon, E. Baudin, P. Goudet & A. Tabarin (2012). "Adrenal involvement in MEN1. Analysis of 715 cases from the Groupe d'etude des Tumeurs Endocrines database". European journal of endocrinology. 166 (2): 269–279. PMID 22084155. doi:10.1530/EJE-11-0679.  Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

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