Adrenocortical carcinoma physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Raviteja Guddeti, M.B.B.S. [2] Ahmad Al Maradni, M.D. [3] Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[4]

Overview

Common physical examination findings of adrenocortical carcinoma include findings of Cushing's syndrome such as hypertensionweakness, gynecomastia, and acne. Hyperandrogenic cases may show findings such as clitoromegaly and hirsutism

Physical Examination

Appearance of the patient

Vitals

Chest

Skin

Head

Abdomen

Extremities

Neurologic

Genitals

References

  1. Nieman LK (2015). "Cushing's syndrome: update on signs, symptoms and biochemical screening.". Eur J Endocrinol. 173 (4): M33–8. PMC 4553096Freely accessible. PMID 26156970. doi:10.1530/EJE-15-0464. 
  2. La Batide-Alanore A, Chatellier G, Plouin PF (2003). "Diabetes as a marker of pheochromocytoma in hypertensive patients.". J Hypertens. 21 (9): 1703–7. PMID 12923403. doi:10.1097/01.hjh.0000084729.53355.ce. 
  3. Drénou B, Le Tulzo Y, Caulet-Maugendre S, Le Guerrier A, Leclercq C, Guilhem I; et al. (1995). "Pheochromocytoma and secondary erythrocytosis: role of tumour erythropoietin secretion.". Nouv Rev Fr Hematol. 37 (3): 197–9. PMID 7567437. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Nieman LK (2015). "Cushing's syndrome: update on signs, symptoms and biochemical screening.". Eur J Endocrinol. 173 (4): M33–8. PMC 4553096Freely accessible. PMID 26156970. doi:10.1530/EJE-15-0464. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Simonenko VB, Makanin MA, Dulin PA, Vasilchenko MI, Lesovik VS (2012). "[About the signs of malignant pheochromocytoma].". Klin Med (Mosk). 90 (10): 64–8. PMID 23285767. 
  6. Brunaud L, Duh QY (2002). "Aldosteronoma.". Curr Treat Options Oncol. 3 (4): 327–33. PMID 12074769. 

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