Mucormycosis risk factors

Jump to: navigation, search

Mucormycosis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Mucormycosis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Syed Hassan A. Kazmi BSc, MD [2]

Overview

While most individuals are exposed to the fungi on a regular basis, those with immune disorders are more prone to an infection. In humans mucormycosis is most prevalent in immunocompromised patients (HIV/AIDS, the elderlySCID, etc) and patients in acidosis (diabetes, burns), particularly after barrier injury to the skin or mucus membranes, malignancies such as lymphomas and leukemiasrenal failureorgan transplant, long term corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapycirrhosisburns and energy malnutrition. Some 50-75% of patients diagnosed with mucormycosis are estimated to have underlying poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and ketoacidosis.

Risk factors

The following conditions predispose patients to mucormycosis:

References

  1. Binder U, Maurer E, Lass-Flörl C (2014). "Mucormycosis--from the pathogens to the disease". Clin. Microbiol. Infect. 20 Suppl 6: 60–6. doi:10.1111/1469-0691.12566. PMID 24476149.

Linked-in.jpg