Mucormycosis historical perspective

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Mucormycosis Microchapters

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Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Mucormycosis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Syed Hassan A. Kazmi BSc, MD [2]

Overview

Mucormycosis in humans was was first reported in 1885 by a German pathologoist named Paltauf. The disease named “mucormycosis” was subsequently used by an American pathologist R. D. Baker to denote a mycosis caused by some members of Mucorales.

Historical Perspective

  • In 1885, German pathologist Paltauf, reported the first case of mucormycosis in humans and later published a case of upper airway mucormycosis, entitled: “mucormycosis mucorina” in the Virchows archives of pathology and anatomy.[1]
  • In 1943, Gregory et al described the first case of of rhino-orbital cerebral mucormycosis associated with diabetes. Harris in 1955 reported the first known survivor.
  • The term “mucormycosis” was coined by an American pathologist R. D. Baker.[2][3][4]

References

  1. Bell S, Mahoney L (2000). "Mucormycosis: a case study". Crit Care Nurse. 20 (1): 18–23. PMID 11871522.
  2. Brown J (2005). "Zygomycosis: an emerging fungal infection". Am J Health Syst Pharm. 62 (24): 2593–6. doi:10.2146/ajhp050188. PMID 16333056.
  3. Lass-Flörl C (2009). "The changing face of epidemiology of invasive fungal disease in Europe". Mycoses. 52 (3): 197–205. PMID 19391253.
  4. Saegeman V, Maertens J, Ectors N, Meersseman W, Lagrou K (2010). "Epidemiology of mucormycosis: review of 18 cases in a tertiary care hospital". Med. Mycol. 48 (2): 245–54. doi:10.1080/13693780903059477. PMID 19568978.

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