Mucormycosis CT

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CT scan in pulmonary mucormycosis

Mucormycosis Microchapters

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Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Mucormycosis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

CT

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Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Syed Hassan A. Kazmi BSc, MD [2]

Overview

CT scan should be done immediately if mucormycosis is suspected because it can help in delineating the extent of the disease. In rhinocerebral disease, the lesions are isodense to muscle and bone with a rim of soft tissue thickness around the paranasal sinuses if there is sinus involvement. There may be air fluid levels or complete sinus opacification. The reverse halo sign is an important radiographic finding on CT scan which indicates vascular invasion.

CT scan Findings

CT scan in rhinocerebral mucormycosis may demonstrate:[1]

CT scan in pulmonary mucormycosis confirms the findings found on chest x-ray and may demonstrate:[2]

  • Diffuse low attenuation
  • Multiple air lucencies that suggest cavitation
  • Pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms
  • Consolidation
  • Reverse halo sign(groung glass opacity-GGO surrounded by consolidation) suggesting vascular and chest wall invasion

References

  1. Herrera DA, Dublin AB, Ormsby EL, Aminpour S, Howell LP (2009). "Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis". Skull Base. 19 (2): 117–25. doi:10.1055/s-0028-1096209. PMC 2671302. PMID 19721767.
  2. "www.ajronline.org".

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