Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

Jump to: navigation, search

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Nasopharyngeal carcinoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Interventions

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

CDC on Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology in the news

Blogs on Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

Directions to Hospitals Treating Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Nasopharyngeal carcinoma pathophysiology

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Homa Najafi, M.D.[2]Faizan Sheraz, M.D. [3]

Overview

On microscopic histopathological analysis, abundant dense eosinophilic cytoplasm and prominent lymphoid component are characteristic findings of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Pathophysiology

Genetics

Genes involved in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma include:

Pathology

Gross Pathology

The tumor arises from epithelial cells on the surface of the nasopharynx.

Microscopic Pathology

Features:[2]

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma


Nasopharyngeal carcinoma may be classified according to microscopic features into 3 subtypes:[3]

Immunohistochemistry

Immunohistochemistry stains for nasopharyngeal carcinoma include:

  • EBER positive
  • p16 negative[4]

References

  1. Abdel Khalek Abdel Razek, A.; King, A. (2012). "MRI and CT of nasopharyngeal carcinoma". AJR Am J Roentgenol. 198 (1): 11–8. doi:10.2214/AJR.11.6954. PMID 22194474. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma http://librepathology.org/wiki/index.php/Nasopharyngeal_carcinoma
  3. Richard Cote, Saul Suster, Lawrence Weiss, Noel Weidner (Editor). Modern Surgical Pathology (2 Volume Set). London: W B Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-7253-1.
  4. Gulley ML, Nicholls JM, Schneider BG, Amin MB, Ro JY, Geradts J (1998). "Nasopharyngeal carcinomas frequently lack the p16/MTS1 tumor suppressor protein but consistently express the retinoblastoma gene product". Am. J. Pathol. 152 (4): 865–9. PMC 1858242. PMID 9546345. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

Linked-in.jpg