Nasopharyngeal carcinoma historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Homa Najafi, M.D.[2]

Overview

The association between EBV and nasopharyngeal carcinoma was made in1970. In 1970, Zur Hausen and et al, were the first to extract EBV DNA from NPC tumors by using DNA hybridization method. In 1970, Henle and et al, revealed the link between stage of NPC tumors and EBV antibody titer. In 1973, Wolf and et al, found EBV DNA in NPC tumor cells by in situ hybridization methods but not in infiltrating lymphoid cells. Babe Ruth, a famous baseball player suffered from nasopharyngeal cancer.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

Famous Cases

  • Babe Ruth, a famous baseball player suffered from nasopharyngeal cancer.[5]

References

  1. H. zur Hausen, H. Schulte-Holthausen, G. Klein, W. Henle, G. Henle, P. Clifford & L. Santesson (1970). "EBV DNA in biopsies of Burkitt tumours and anaplastic carcinomas of the nasopharynx". Nature. 228 (5276): 1056–1058. PMID 4320657. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. H. zur Hausen, H. Schulte-Holthausen, G. Klein, W. Henle, G. Henle, P. Clifford & L. Santesson (1970). "EBV DNA in biopsies of Burkitt tumours and anaplastic carcinomas of the nasopharynx". Nature. 228 (5276): 1056–1058. PMID 4320657. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. W. Henle, G. Henle, H. C. Ho, P. Burtin, Y. Cachin, P. Clifford, A. de Schryver, G. de-The, V. Diehl & G. Klein (1970). "Antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, other head and neck neoplasms, and control groups". Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 44 (1): 225–231. PMID 11515035. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  4. H. Wolf, H. zur Hausen & V. Becker (1973). "EB viral genomes in epithelial nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells". Nature: New biology. 244 (138): 245–247. PMID 4353684. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  5. "10 Famous People Who Have Suffered from Head and Neck Cancer – Dr. Jeffrey Faulkner, ENT".

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