Aortic stenosis CT

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, MBBS [2]; Mohammed A. Sbeih, M.D. [3]; Usama Talib, BSc, MD [4] Assistant Editor-In-Chief: Kristin Feeney, B.S. [5]

Overview

Computed tomography can be helpful as a diagnostic tool in conditions where the echocardiographic findings are inconclusive.[1]

CT Scan

Shown below is the plain CT of a patient with supravalvular aortic stenosis. The image shows an almost circular supravalvular aortic calcification of the aortic wall with extension of calcifications into the left main stem. The area of calcification is shown in yellow.

Plain ct.jpg

Advantages

Following are a few advantages of the use of CT in Aortic Stenosis.[2]

  • CT scan provides additional anatomic details compared to echocardiography.
  • It may allow quantitattion of chamber sizes and calcification of the aortic valve.
  • The presence of calcification is a marker of hemodynamic severity, particularly in the younger patient.
  • It is done faster compared to MRI, thus avoiding the need for anesthesia in small children.

Disadvantages

  • CT scan is costly.
  • Radiation can have long terms side-effect on growing children.

References

  1. F. Ciolina, P. Sedati, F. Zaccagna, N. Galea, V. Noce, F. Miraldi, E. Cavarretta, M. Francone & I. Carbone (2015). "Aortic valve stenosis: non-invasive preoperative evaluation using 64-slice CT angiography". The Journal of cardiovascular surgery. 56 (5): 799–808. PMID 26088011. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. Christopher J. Bennett, Joseph J. Maleszewski & Philip A. Araoz (2012). "CT and MR imaging of the aortic valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation". Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. 32 (5): 1399–1420. doi:10.1148/rg.325115727. PMID 22977027. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)


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