Intussusception physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sargun Singh Walia M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

Patients with intussusception usually appear in distress . Physical examination of patients with intussusception is usually remarkable for Dance's sign, sausage shaped palpable mass, and abdominal distension. On rectal examination the intussusceptum might be felt. Classical sign of intussusception is currant jelly stools, and may present in a minority of cases at a later stage of the disease. Patient with intussusception usually appear chubby and there may be loss of appetite.

Physical Examination

The presence of following findings on physical examination is highly suggestive of intussusception.

Other features

  • Episode lasts 15 to 30 mins

Appearance of the patient

  • Patient with intussusception are usually chubby and healthy.
  • Intussusception is uncommon in malnourished patients.
  • Patients with intussusception usually appear in distress.

Vital signs

Skin

Abdomen

Rectal examination

  • Intussusceptum may be felt by the finger

References

  1. Sty JR, Babbitt DP, Boedecker RA (1980). "Radionuclide "Dance Sign."". Clin Nucl Med. 5 (11): 502–3. PMID 7438637.
  2. Toso C, Erne M, Lenzlinger PM, Schmid JF, Büchel H, Melcher G, Morel P (2005). "Intussusception as a cause of bowel obstruction in adults". Swiss Med Wkly. 135 (5–6): 87–90. doi:2005/05/smw-10693 Check |doi= value (help). PMID 15729613.
  3. Yamamoto LG, Morita SY, Boychuk RB, Inaba AS, Rosen LM, Yee LL, Young LL (1997). "Stool appearance in intussusception: assessing the value of the term "currant jelly"". Am J Emerg Med. 15 (3): 293–8. PMID 9148991.
  4. Mehta MH, Patel RV, Gondalia JS (1993). "Intraperitoneal red currant jelly in intussusception". Indian J Pediatr. 60 (3): 455–7. PMID 8253498.