Carotid body tumor epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sahar Memar Montazerin, M.D.[2] Maria Fernanda Villarreal, M.D. [3]

Overview

The incidence of carotid body tumor is less than 3 in 100,000 individuals. It is the most common paraganglioma of the head and neck and comprises approximately 65% of paragangliomas. The prevalence of head and neck paraganglioma is 3% of all paraganglioma. This tumor is more commonly observed in the adults and particularly in their fifth decade of life. It affects both gender equally.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

Prevalence

Age

  • Carotid body tumor is more commonly observed in the adults and particularly in their fifth decade of life.[4]
  • In familial cases, the mean age of onset is younger, being the second or fourth decade of life.[5]

Gender

  • There is no gender preference in the incidence of this tumor according to the recent literature except in the high altitude where the tumor is more prevalent among women.[5][6]

Race

References

  1. Wieneke, Jacqueline A.; Smith, Alice (2009). "Paraganglioma: Carotid Body Tumor". Head and Neck Pathology. 3 (4): 303–306. doi:10.1007/s12105-009-0130-5. ISSN 1936-055X.
  2. Bakoyiannis KC, Georgopoulos SE, Klonaris CN, Tsekouras NS, Felekouras ES, Pikoulis EA, Griniatsos JE, Papalambros EL, Bastounis EA (March 2006). "Surgical treatment of carotid body tumors without embolization". Int Angiol. 25 (1): 40–5. PMID 16520723.
  3. Xiao, Zebin; She, Dejun; Cao, Dairong (2015). "Multiple paragangliomas of head and neck associated with hepatic paraganglioma: a case report". BMC Medical Imaging. 15 (1). doi:10.1186/s12880-015-0082-z. ISSN 1471-2342.
  4. Lee, Ki Yeol; Oh, Yu-Whan; Noh, Hyung Jun; Lee, Yu Jin; Yong, Hwan-Seok; Kang, Eun-Young; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Nam Joon (2006). "Extraadrenal Paragangliomas of the Body: Imaging Features". American Journal of Roentgenology. 187 (2): 492–504. doi:10.2214/AJR.05.0370. ISSN 0361-803X.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Burgess, Alfred; Calderon, Moises; Jafif-Cojab, Marcos; Jorge, Diego; Balanza, Ricardo (2017). "Bilateral carotid body tumor resection in a female patient". International Journal of Surgery Case Reports. 41: 387–391. doi:10.1016/j.ijscr.2017.11.019. ISSN 2210-2612.
  6. Jin ZQ, He W, Wu DF, Lin MY, Jiang HT (September 2016). "Color Doppler Ultrasound in Diagnosis and Assessment of Carotid Body Tumors: Comparison with Computed Tomography Angiography". Ultrasound Med Biol. 42 (9): 2106–13. doi:10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2016.04.007. PMID 27316787.