Riedel's thyroiditis diagnostic criteria

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Furqan M M. M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Diagnostic criteria of Riedel's thyroiditis is based on the histopathological findings and includes infiltration of inflammatory cells in the thyroid gland, extension beyond the capsule, evidence of occlusive phlebitis and absence of giant cells, lymphoid follicles, or granulomas.

Diagnostic criteria

Definitive diagnosis of Riedel's thyroiditis is made only with histopathology, after an open biopsy or decompressive goiter surgery performed for clinical symptoms. Specific histopathological criteria required to establish the diagnosis of Riedel’s thyroiditis is:[1][2][3]

  1. The inflammatory process in the thyroid with extension into surrounding tissue.
  2. The inflammatory infiltrates should contain no giant cells, lymphoid follicles, or granulomas.
  3. Evidence of occlusive phlebitis.
  4. No evidence of thyroid malignancy.

Stepwise clinical diagnosis of Riedel's thyroiditis

The following flowchart describes the clinical approach to the diagnosis of Riedel's thyroiditis.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Neck pain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
No
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RAIU*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Presenting symptoms and TFTs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Increased
 
 
Decreased
 
 
 
 
 
Hyperthyroid
 
 
 
Hypothyroid
 
Euthyroid
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RAIU*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Suppurative thyroiditis
 
 
De Quervain's thyroiditis
 
 
 
Increased
 
Decreased
 
Hashimoto's thyroiditis
 
 
Riedel's thyroiditis††
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grave's disease
 
Silent thyroiditis


Postpartum thyroiditis

‡TFT; Thyroid function tests(TSH, T4, and T3), †Grave's disease is not a thyroiditis, *RAIU; Radioiodine uptake.††One third of Riedel's thyroiditis presents with hypothyroidism.
Table modified from [4]

References

  1. Hennessey JV (2011). "Clinical review: Riedel's thyroiditis: a clinical review". J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 96 (10): 3031–41. doi:10.1210/jc.2011-0617. PMID 21832114.
  2. Harach HR, Williams ED (1983). "Fibrous thyroiditis--an immunopathological study". Histopathology. 7 (5): 739–51. PMID 6195075.
  3. Papi G, LiVolsi VA (2004). "Current concepts on Riedel thyroiditis". Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 121 Suppl: S50–63. PMID 15298150.
  4. "Thyroiditis: Differential Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician".

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