Paget's disease of the breast physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Kiran Singh, M.D. [2];Suveenkrishna Pothuru, M.B,B.S. [3]

Overview

Common physical examination findings of Paget's disease of the breast include eczematous appearance of the nipple associated with yellowish or bloody discharge.

Physical Examination

Physical examination of patients should be perform both in sitting position and supine position to examine breast abnormalities.[1][2]

Breast

  • Crusting, ulcers or scaling on the nipple followed by the areola
  • Discharge from nipple (often bloody)
  • Inverted nipple
  • Bilateral breast examination to check for palpable mass or lump:
  • Lump may be attached to the skin or chest wall and cannot be moved.
  • The lump may feel hard, irregular in shape and very different from the rest of the breast tissue
  • The lump may be tender, but it is usually not painful.
  • Change in size of affected breast
  • Skin changes:
  • Dimpling of the skin
  • Thickening and dimpling of the skin (Peau d'orange).

Lymph Nodes

Breast

References

  1. El Khoury M, Lalonde L, David J, Issa-Chergui B, Peloquin L, Trop I (June 2011). "Paget's disease of the axilla arising from an underlying accessory mammary tissue". Clin Radiol. 66 (6): 575–7. doi:10.1016/j.crad.2010.12.010. PMID 21345424.
  2. Tan AR (June 2016). "Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer". Semin. Oncol. 43 (3): 331–4. doi:10.1053/j.seminoncol.2016.02.030. PMID 27178684.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 "Dermatology Atlas".

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