Takayasu's arteritis physical examination

Jump to: navigation, search

Takayasu's arteritis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Takayasu's arteritis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-Ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT Scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Takayasu's arteritis physical examination On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Takayasu's arteritis physical examination

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Takayasu's arteritis physical examination

on Takayasu's arteritis physical examination

Takayasu's arteritis physical examination in the news

Blogs onTakayasu's arteritis physical examination

Directions to Hospitals Treating Takayasu's arteritis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Takayasu's arteritis physical examination

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Farnaz Khalighinejad, MD [2]

Overview

In a patient with Takayasu arteritis a thorough physical examination is essential, with particular attention to peripheral pulses, blood pressure in all 4 extremities, and ophthalmologic examination. The most common finding is pulseless upper extremities. Hypertension due to renal artery involvement is found in approximately 50% of patients. Absent or diminished pulses are the clinical hallmark of Takayasu arteritis, but pulses are normal in many patients and upper limbs are affected more often than lower limbs. Ophthalmologic examination may show retinal ischemia, retinal hemorrhages, cotton-wool exudates, venous dilatation and beading, microaneurysms of peripheral retinaoptic atrophyvitreous hemorrhage, and wreathlike peripapillary arteriovenous anastomoses.

Physical Examination

In a patient with Takayasu arteritis a thorough physical examination is essential, with particular attention to:[1][2]

Vital Signs

Skin

HEENT

Ophthalmologic examination may show:[3]

Neck

Lungs

  • Pulmonary examination of patients with Takayasu arteritis is usually normal.

Heart

  • Abdomen

Back

  • Back examination of patients with Takayasu's arteritis is usually normal.

Genitourinary

  • Genitourinary examination of patients with Takayasu's arteritis is usually normal.

Neuromuscular

Extremities

References

  1. Kerr GS, Hallahan CW, Giordano J, Leavitt RY, Fauci AS, Rottem M, Hoffman GS (June 1994). "Takayasu arteritis". Ann. Intern. Med. 120 (11): 919–29. PMID 7909656.
  2. Mason JC (July 2010). "Takayasu arteritis--advances in diagnosis and management". Nat Rev Rheumatol. 6 (7): 406–15. doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2010.82. PMID 20596053.
  3. Hall S, Barr W, Lie JT, Stanson AW, Kazmier FJ, Hunder GG (March 1985). "Takayasu arteritis. A study of 32 North American patients". Medicine (Baltimore). 64 (2): 89–99. PMID 2858047.



Linked-in.jpg