Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

Jump to: navigation, search

Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome from Other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

CDC on Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice in the news

Blogs on Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

Directions to Hospitals Treating Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome

Risk calculators and risk factors for Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome diagnostic study of choice

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief:

Overview

The two established criteria for the clinical diagnosis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome are Baltimore criteria and modified Seattle criteria.

Diagnostic Criteria

The diagnosis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome should be considered in any patient who has undergone hematopoietic cell transplant and develops liver dysfunction.

  • The two established criteria for the clinical diagnosis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome are:[1][2][3]
Baltimore Criteria Seattle criteria
  • Within 30 days of transplantation, bilirubinemia > 34.2 mol/L (2 mg/dL), plus 2 other findings among the following:
    • Hepatomegaly, usually painful
    •  > 5% weight gain
    • Ascites
  • Within 20 days of transplantation, two of three findings among the following:
    • Bilirubin > 34.2 mol/L (2 mg/dL)
    • Hepatomegaly or RUQ pain of liver origin
    • > 2% weight gain due to fluid accumulation

References

  1. Valla DC, Cazals-Hatem D (2016). "Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome". Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol. 40 (4): 378–85. doi:10.1016/j.clinre.2016.01.006. PMID 27038846.
  2. Gozdzik J, Krasowska-Kwiecień A, Wedrychowicz A (2008). "[Sinusoidal obstruction disease (SOS), previous hepatic venoocclusive disease (VOD)--still serious complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation]". Prz. Lek. (in Polish). 65 (4): 203–8. PMID 18724548.
  3. McDonald GB, Sharma P, Matthews DE, Shulman HM, Thomas ED (1984). "Venocclusive disease of the liver after bone marrow transplantation: diagnosis, incidence, and predisposing factors". Hepatology. 4 (1): 116–22. PMID 6363247.

Linked-in.jpg