Rocky Mountain spotted fever case study one

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Michael Maddaleni, B.S.

Overview

The following case study involves a young girl, 4 years of age, in Panama. This is the first known fatal case of RMSF in the region since approximately the 1950s.

Case Study

Patient presentation[1]

Laboratory tests[1]

Outcomes and Conclusions[1]

On the same day the patient was admitted, she had an episode of seizures, and the patient passed away shortly after, despite intense medical intervention. An autopsy was performed and some of the main findings of this procedure were interstitial pneumonitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, interstitial nephritis, and generalized lymphadenitis. After subsequent laboratory tests, the diagnosis of RMSF was made.

The death of this patient was due to a couple of reasons. The first is that it took too long to make a diagnosis. In turn, this caused there to be a delay in treating the patient with the correct antibiotic treatment. In order to prevent an outcome like this, treatment should begin even before the results from the diagnostic tests are available. Treatment should continue for 7 to 10 days or when the patient has been fever free for at least 3 days[1].

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Estripeaut D, Aramburú MG, Sáez-Llorens X, Thompson HA, Dasch GA, Paddock CD, Zaki S, Eremeeva ME (2007). "Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 13 (11): 1763–5. PMID 18217566. Retrieved 2012-02-14. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

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