Morton's neuroma historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sara Mohsin, M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

The term neuroma originates from two Greek words, neuro- from the Greek word for nerve (νεῦρον), and -oma (-ωμα) from the Greek word for swelling. In 1876, neuroma was first described by Thomas Morton and Morton's neuroma was first correctly described by a chiropodist named Durlacher. In 2000, a small study reviewed the medical records of 85 people who had their feet imaged with MRI, and it was found out that 33% of the patients had morton's neuroma without any pain. In 2000, another study was conducted in which ultrasound done on patients with morton's neuroma demonstrated to have 100% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity and 96.7% accuracy in detecting the location of morton's neuroma.

Historical Perspective

References

  1. Bencardino J, Rosenberg ZS, Beltran J, Liu X, Marty-Delfaut E (2000). "Morton's neuroma: is it always symptomatic?". AJR Am J Roentgenol. 175 (3): 649–53. doi:10.2214/ajr.175.3.1750649. PMID 10954445.
  2. Tobajas Asensio E, Tobajas Asensio JA, Boada Apilluelo E, Torres Nuez J (2000). "[Echography evaluation of Morton's neuroma]". An Med Interna. 17 (8): 416–8. PMID 11218988.

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