Minimal change disease historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Minimal change disease was first described by F. Munk in 1913, when he coined the term “lipoid nephrosis” following the observation of lipid-laden macrophages in the proximal tubular epithelial cells and oval fat bodies in urine. In 1925, Fahr and colleagues noted the resemblance of minimal change disease to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Ever since its early description, the term “lipoid nephrosis” has been criticized due to the clinical irrelevance of the lipid-laden cells seen on microscopy.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

  • The term “lipoid nephrosis,” introduced in the early 1900s in which microscopic lipid droplets in urine and tubular cells were noticed in minimal change disease.[1][2]

References

  1. Vivarelli, Marina; Massella, Laura; Ruggiero, Barbara; Emma, Francesco (2017). "Minimal Change Disease". Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 12 (2): 332–345. doi:10.2215/CJN.05000516. ISSN 1555-9041.
  2. D'Agati V (2003). "Pathologic classification of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis". Semin Nephrol. 23 (2): 117–34. doi:10.1053/snep.2003.50012. PMID 12704572.
  3. Vivarelli, Marina; Massella, Laura; Ruggiero, Barbara; Emma, Francesco (2017). "Minimal Change Disease". Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 12 (2): 332–345. doi:10.2215/CJN.05000516. ISSN 1555-9041.
  4. FARQUHAR MG, VERNIER RL, GOOD RA (November 1957). "An electron microscope study of the glomerulus in nephrosis, glomerulonephritis, and lupus erythematosus". J. Exp. Med. 106 (5): 649–60. PMC 2136823. PMID 13475621.

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