Mast cell tumor epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Suveenkrishna Pothuru, M.B,B.S. [2]

Overview

Mast cell tumor is a rare disease and considered to be an "orphan disease" affecting 200,000 or fewer people in the United States. There are no definite data regarding the prevalence of mast cell tumor among the US general population. Cutaneous mastocytosis is more common in children and the disease manifest itself in the first year of life in over 80% of cases. There is no sex predilection and race predilection to the mast cell tumor.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Mast cell tumor is a rare disease characterized by abnormal growth and accumulation of mast cells in various organs. It is considered to be an "orphan disease" affecting 200,000 or fewer people in the United States.[1]

Incidence

  • There are no definite data regarding the exact incidence and prevalence of mast cell tumor among the US general population.[2]

Age

  • Patients of all age groups may develop mast cell tumor.
  • Urticaria pigmentosa, the cutaneous mastocytosis is more common in children and the disease manifest itself in the first year of life in over 80% of cases.[3]
  • Second smaller peak of incidence is observed in adults in the third to fourth decade.[3]
  • Systemic mastocytosis generally occurs in middle age.

Gender

  • There is no sex predilection to the mast cell tumor.

Race

  • There is no racial predilection to the mast cell tumor.

References

  1. Koenig, Martial; Morel, Jérôme; Reynaud, Jacqueline; Varvat, Cécile; Cathébras, Pascal (2008). "An unusual cause of spontaneous bleeding in the intensive care unit – mastocytosis: a case report". Cases Journal. 1 (1): 100. doi:10.1186/1757-1626-1-100. ISSN 1757-1626.
  2. Brockow K (2014). "Epidemiology, prognosis, and risk factors in mastocytosis". Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 34 (2): 283–95. doi:10.1016/j.iac.2014.01.003. PMID 24745674.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ferrante, Giuliana; Scavone, Valeria; Muscia, Maria; Adrignola, Emilia; Corsello, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania (2015). "The care pathway for children with urticaria, angioedema, mastocytosis". World Allergy Organization Journal. 8 (1): 5. doi:10.1186/s40413-014-0052-x. ISSN 1939-4551.

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