Strongyloidiasis

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This page is about clinical aspects of the disease.  For microbiologic aspects of the causative organism(s), see Strongyloides stercoralis.
Strongyloidiasis
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Strongyloides - very high mag - 2.jpg
Micrograph showing strongyloidiasis; a fragment of a worm is seen in the lower right hand corner. H&E stain.

For patient information, click here

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Differentiating Strongyloidiasis from other Diseases

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Case #1

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Synonyms and Keywords: Strongyloides infection

Overview

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Strongyloidiasis from other Diseases

Differentiating Strongyloides stercoralis infection from other Nematode infections[1][2]
Nematode Transmission Direct Person-Person Transmission Duration of Infection Pulmonary Manifestation Location of Adult worm(s) Treatment
Ascaris lumbricoides Ingestion of infective ova No 1-2 years Free in the lumen of the small bowel

(primarily jejunum)

Trichuris trichiura

(whipworm)

Ingestion of infective ova No 1-3 years No pulmonary migration, therefore, no pulmonary manifestation Anchored in the superficial mucosa of cecum and colon
Hookworm (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale) Skin penetration by filariform larvae No
  • 3-5 years (Necator)
  • 1 year (Ancylostoma)
Attached to the mucosa of mid-upper portion of the small bowel
Strongyloides stercoralis Filariform larvae penetrates skin or bowel mucosa Yes Lifetime of the host Embedded in the mucosa of the duodenum, jejunum
Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) Ingestion of infective ova Yes 1 month Extraintestinal migration is very rare[3] Free in the lumen of cecum, appendix, adjacent colon

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms | Physical Examination | Laboratory Findings | Imaging Findings | Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy | Prevention | Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy | Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1
  1. Durand, Marlene (2015). "Chapter 288:Intestinal Nematodes (Roundworms)". Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases Updated Edition, Eighth Edition. Elsevier. pp. 3199–3207. ISBN 978-1-4557-4801-3.
  2. Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis; Tanowitz, Herbert (2016). "Chapter 39:Parasitic Infections". Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine Sixth Edition. Elsevier. pp. 682–698. ISBN 978-1-4557-3383-5. 
  3. Serpytis M, Seinin D (2012). "Fatal case of ectopic enterobiasis: Enterobius vermicularis in the kidneys.". Scand J Urol Nephrol. 46 (1): 70–2. PMID 21879805. doi:10.3109/00365599.2011.609834. 

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