Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics

Jump to: navigation, search

Amoebiasis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Amoebiasis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Imaging

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics

CDC onAmoebiasis epidemiology and demographics

Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics in the news

Blogs on Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics</small>

to Hospitals Treating Amoebiasis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Amoebiasis epidemiology and demographics

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yazan Daaboul, M.D.; Serge Korjian M.D.

Overview

Amoebiasis is a worldwide infection whose incidence is highly dependent on sanitation practices. Worldwide, the annual incidence of amoebiasis is approximately 50 million cases. Prevalence of amoebiasis ranges from approximately 4% in the USA to 50% in certain regions in developing countries. It is thought that the prevalence of E. dispar is much higher than that of E. histolytica, but E. dispar is frequently undiagnosed because colonized individuals are almost always asymptomatic. Worldwide, approximately 500 million individuals are thought to be colonized by E. dispar. Worldwide, amoabiasis is associated with 100,000 deaths each year and a case-fatality rate of approximately 200 per 100,000 cases. Elderly patients and young children are at higher risk of developing amoebiasis than adults, but adults are at higher risk of developing amebic liver abscess than children. Men are at higher risk of developing invasive amoebiasis and amebic liver abscess than women. In the USA, the prevalence of amoebiasis is much more common among Hispanic and Asian immigrants and immigrants from Pacific Islands. However, the higher prevalence is though to be due to the immigration status, not due to ethnic differences.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence and Prevalence

  • Amoebiasis is a worldwide infection whose incidence is highly dependent on sanitation practices.
  • Worldwide, the annual incidence of amoebiasis is approximately 50 million cases.[1][2][3]
  • Prevalence of amoebiasis ranges from approximately 4% in the USA to 50% in certain regions in developing countries.[4]
  • It is thought that the prevalence of E. dispar is much higher than that of E. histolytica, but E. dispar is frequently undiagnosed because colonized individuals are almost always asymptomatic. Worldwide, approximately 500 million individuals are thought to be colonized by E. dispar.[5]
  • In the USA, amoebiasis is more common among immigrants (Hispanic, Asian, or from Pacific Islands) than other groups.

Mortality

  • Worldwide, amoabiasis is associated with 100,000 deaths each year and a case-fatality rate of approximately 200 per 100,000 cases.[1][2][3]
  • Fewer than 10 amoebiasis-related deaths are reported annually in the USA.

Age

  • Elderly patients and young children are at higher risk of developing amoebiasis than adults.
  • Adults are at higher risk of developing amebic liver abscess than children (the incidence of amebic liver abscess is up to 10x higher in adults than in children).

Gender

  • There is no gender predilection for the development of amoebiasis.
  • Men are at higher risk of developing invasive amoebiasis and amebic liver abscess than women (the incidence of amebic liver abscess is up to 3x-10x higher in men than in women).

Ethnicity

  • In the USA, the prevalence of amoebiasis is much more common among Hispanic and Asian immigrants and immigrants from Pacific Islands. However, the higher prevalence is though to be due to the immigration status, not due to ethnic differences.

Developing Countries

  • The incidence of amoebiasis is higher in developing countries than in developed countries, particulary in regioins with poor sanitation systems.
  • The incidence of amoebiasis may reach up to 50% in certain regions.

Developed Countries

  • The incidence of amoebiasis is much lower in developed countries than in developing countries. The lower incidence is attributed to access to safe drinking water and food handling.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Valenzuela O, Morán P, Gómez A, Cordova K, Corrales N, Cardoza J et al. (2007). "Epidemiology of amoebic liver abscess in Mexico: the case of Sonora.". Ann Trop Med Parasitol 101 (6): 533-8. doi:10.1179/136485907X193851. PMID 17716437.
  2. 2.0 2.1 van Hal SJ, Stark DJ, Fotedar R, Marriott D, Ellis JT, Harkness JL (2007). "Amoebiasis: current status in Australia.". Med J Aust 186 (8): 412-6. PMID 17437396.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ximénez C, Morán P, Rojas L, Valadez A, Gómez A (2009). "Reassessment of the epidemiology of amebiasis: state of the art.". Infect Genet Evol 9 (6): 1023-32. doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2009.06.008. PMID 19540361.
  4. Tengku SA, Norhayati M (2011). "Public health and clinical importance of amoebiasis in Malaysia: a review.". Trop Biomed 28 (2): 194-222. PMID 22041740.
  5. Fotedar R, Stark D, Beebe N, Marriott D, Ellis J, Harkness J (2007). "Laboratory diagnostic techniques for Entamoeba species.". Clin Microbiol Rev 20 (3): 511-32, table of contents. doi:10.1128/CMR.00004-07. PMID 17630338.



Linked-in.jpg