Alzheimer's disease Other Imaging Findings

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Akshun Kalia M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

Other imaging studies in Alzheimer's include positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. PET and SPECT scan are not routinely done in Alzheimer's disease. However, patients with atypical presentation may be evaluated with either a PET or SPECT scan to assess for any underlying condition. In these patients, use of amyloid β PET scan will reveal lower FDG (fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose) metabolism and higher PiB ([11 C]Pittsburgh compound B) deposition in areas of the brain affected by Alzheimer's disease. On SPECT scan patients with Alzheimer's disease have low relative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the parietal and prefrontal cortices.

Other Imaging Findings

Other imaging studies include:[1][2][3][4][5][6]

References

  1. Geda, Yonas E. (2012). "Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults". Current Psychiatry Reports. 14 (4): 320–327. doi:10.1007/s11920-012-0291-x. ISSN 1523-3812.
  2. Trollor JN, Sachdev PS, Haindl W, Brodaty H, Wen W, Walker BM (2005). "Regional cerebral blood flow deficits in mild Alzheimer's disease using high resolution single photon emission computerized tomography". Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci. 59 (3): 280–90. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1819.2005.01372.x. PMID 15896221.
  3. Trollor JN, Sachdev PS, Haindl W, Brodaty H, Wen W, Walker BM (2006). "A high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography study of verbal recognition memory in Alzheimer's disease". Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 21 (4): 267–74. doi:10.1159/000091433. PMID 16479105.
  4. Ferris SH, de Leon MJ, Wolf AP, Farkas T, Christman DR, Reisberg B, Fowler JS, Macgregor R, Goldman A, George AE, Rampal S (1980). "Positron emission tomography in the study of aging and senile dementia". Neurobiol. Aging. 1 (2): 127–31. PMID 24279935.
  5. Rapoport SI (1986). "Positron emission tomography in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease". Gerontology. 32 Suppl 1: 6–13. PMID 3488245.
  6. Cutler NR (1986). "Cerebral metabolism as measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F] 2-deoxy-D-glucose: healthy aging, Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome". Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry. 10 (3–5): 309–21. PMID 2948218.

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