Urinary incontinence medical therapy

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Urinary incontinence Microchapters

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Differentiating Urinary incontinence from other Diseases

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Medical Therapy

Medications can reduce many types of leakage. Some drugs inhibit contractions of an overactive bladder. Others relax muscles, leading to more complete bladder emptying during urination. Some drugs tighten muscles at the bladder neck and urethra, preventing leakage. And some, especially hormones such as estrogen, are believed to cause muscles involved in urination to function normally.

Pharmacotherapy

In vaginal atrophy - topical or vaginal estrogens; tolterodine, oxybutynin, propantheline, darifenacin, solifenacin, trospium in urge incontinence, imipramine in mixed and stress urinary incontinence, pseudoephedrine and duloxetine in stress urinary incontinence.

Some of these medications can produce harmful side effects if used for long periods. In particular, estrogen therapy has been associated with an increased risk for cancers of the breast and endometrium (lining of the uterus). A patient should talk to a doctor about the risks and benefits of long-term use of medications.

Pessaries

A pessary is a medical device that is inserted into the vagina. The most common kind is ring shaped, and is typically recommended to correct vaginal prolapse. The pessary compresses the urethra against the symphysis pubis and elevates the bladder neck. For some women this may reduce stress leakage. If a pessary is used, vaginal and urinary tract infections may occur and regular monitoring by a doctor is recommended.

References



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