Paraesthesia medical therapy

Jump to: navigation, search

Paraesthesia Microchapters

Home

Overview

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Causes

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Case Studies

Case #1

Paraesthesia medical therapy On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Paraesthesia medical therapy

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Paraesthesia medical therapy

CDC on Paraesthesia medical therapy

Paraesthesia medical therapy in the news

Blogs on Paraesthesia medical therapy

Directions to Hospitals Treating Paraesthesia

Risk calculators and risk factors for Paraesthesia medical therapy

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Medical Therapy

Treatment should be decided by a neurologist. Medications offered can include prednisone, intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG) and anticonvulsants such as gabapentin or gabitril, amongst others.

In some cases, rocking the head from side to side will painlessly remove the "pins and needles" sensation in less than a minute. A tingly hand or arm is often the result of compression in the bundle of nerves in the neck. Loosening the neck muscles releases the pressure. Compressed nerves lower in the body govern the feet, and standing up and walking around will typically relieve the sensation. [1]

An arm that has "fallen asleep" may also be "awoken" more quickly by clenching and unclenching the fist several times; the muscle movement increases blood flow and helps the limb return to normal.

In general;

  • Immobilization
  • Support vitamin deficiency
  • Treat infections or diseases that may be underlying

Pharmacotherapy

Acute Pharmacotherapies

  • NSAIDs, acetominophin, epidural steroids (if severe)
  • Painful peripheral neuropathies - treat with amitriptyline,desipramine, phenytoin, carbamezapine or topical capsaicin cram

References



Linked-in.jpg