Mycosis fungoides epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sogand Goudarzi, MD [2]

Overview

The incidence of mycosis fungoides increases with age; the median age at diagnosis is between 45 and 55 years of age. In the United States, males are more commonly affected with mycosis fungoides than females. In the United States, mycosis fungoides usually affects individuals of the African American race.

Epidemiology and demographics

Age

  • The incidence of mycosis fungoides increases with age; the median age at diagnosis is between 40 and 60 years of age.[1]
  • Mycosis fungoidesaffects individuals younger than majority of patients and this diseases are reported in children.[1]

Gender

  • In the United States, males are more commonly affected with mycosis fungoides than females.[1][2]

Race

  • In the United States, mycosis fungoides affects individuals of the African American race.[1][2]

Region

  • The majority of mycosis fungoides (primary and secondary) cases are reported in geographical variances folllowing viral-induced lymphomas might show partial geographical restriction.[3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Foss, Francine M.; Girardi, Michael (2017). "Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome". Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America. 31 (2): 297–315. doi:10.1016/j.hoc.2016.11.008. ISSN 0889-8588.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Mycosis fungoides. Radiopaedia.http://radiopaedia.org/articles/mycosis-fungoides Accessed on January 21, 2016
  3. Lome-Maldonado, Carmen; Hernández-Salazar, Amparo; García-Vera, JorgeAndrés; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Ortiz-Pedroza, Guadalupe; Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Orozco-Topete, Rocío; Morales-Leyte, AnaLilia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith (2017). "Oral and cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and sézary syndrome in a mexican cohort: Recategorization and evaluation of international geographical disparities". Indian Journal of Dermatology. 62 (2): 158. doi:10.4103/ijd.IJD_34_17. ISSN 0019-5154.

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