Intracranial hemorrhage overview

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Intra-Axial Hemorrhage
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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

An intracranial hemorrhage is a hemorrhage, or bleeding, within the skull. Intracerebral bleeds are the second most common cause of stroke, accounting for 30–60% of hospital admissions for stroke.[1]

High blood pressure raises the risk of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage by two to six times.[1] More common in adults than in children, intraparenchymal bleeds due to trauma are usually due to penetrating head trauma, but can also be due to depressed skull fractures, acceleration-deceleration trauma,[2][3][4] rupture of an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and bleeding within a tumor. A very small proportion is due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Yadav YR, Mukerji G, Shenoy R, Basoor A, Jain G, Nelson A (2007). "Endoscopic management of hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus". BMC Neurol. 7: 1. doi:10.1186/1471-2377-7-1. PMC 1780056. PMID 17204141.
  2. McCaffrey P. 2001. "The Neuroscience on the Web Series: CMSD 336 Neuropathologies of Language and Cognition." California State University, Chico. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  3. Orlando Regional Healthcare, Education and Development. 2004. "Overview of Adult Traumatic Brain Injuries." Retrieved on 2008-01-16.
  4. Shepherd S. 2004. "Head Trauma." Emedicine.com. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.



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