Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (patient information)

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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

Overview

What are the symptoms?

Who is at highest risk?

When to seek urgent medical care?

Diagnosis

Treatment options

Where to find medical care for Idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Possible complications

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Varun Kumar, M.B.B.S.

Overview

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension also known as Pseudotumor cerebri is a process affecting the brain that appears to be -- but is not -- a tumor. It is often reversible.

What are the symptoms of Idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Symptoms may get worse during physical activity, especially when you tighten the stomach muscles.

Who is at highest risk?

The condition occurs more often in women than men, especially in obese women who are about to go through menopause. It is rare in infants, but can occur in children.

The cause is unknown.

Certain medicines can increase your risk for this condition. These medicines include:

The following factors are also related to this condition:

When to seek urgent medical care?

Call your health care provider if you or your child experiences the symptoms listed above.

Diagnosis

The doctor will perform a physical exam. Signs of this condition include:

  • Bulging anterior fontanelle
  • Increased head size
  • Swelling of the optic nerve in the back of the eye (papilledema)

Even though there is increased pressure in the skull, there is no change in alertness.

Tests that may be done include:

  • CT scan of the head
  • Eye exam, incluiding visual field testing
  • MRI of the head with MR venography
  • Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

The diagnosis is made when other health conditions are ruled out. Several conditions may cause increased pressure in the skull, including:

Treatment options

Treatment is aimed at the cause of the pseudotumor.

A lumbar puncture can help relieve pressure in the brain and prevent vision problems.

Other treatments may include:

  • Fluid or salt restriction
  • Medications such as corticosteroids, acetazolamide, and furosemide
  • Shunting procedures to relieve pressure from spinal fluid buildup
  • Surgery to relieve pressure on the optic nerve
  • Weight loss

Patients will need to have their vision closely monitored. There can be vision loss, which is sometimes permanent. Follow-up MRI or CT scans may be done to rule out hidden cancer.

Where to find medical care for Idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Directions to Hospitals Treating Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Sometimes the condition disappears on its own within 6 months. About 10-20% of persons have their symptoms return. A small number of patients have symptoms that slowly get worse and lead to blindness.

Possible complications

Vision loss is a serious complication of this condition.

Sources

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000351.htm


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