Hepatitis E future or investigational therapies

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: João André Alves Silva, M.D. [2]

Overview

Attending to the impact of hepatitis E worldwide, further studies are required to diagnose and treat severe cases of the disease. Serological assays to identify past and current infections should be developed, in order to help in the accurate diagnosis of hepatitis E, in high-risk patients.[1][2]

Future or Investigational Therapies

Patients with elevated liver transaminases, particularly immunocompromised and with end-stage liver disease should be tested for the presence of HEV RNA. Pregnant women with hepatitis E have an increased risk of complications. Therefore, when in the presence of elevated liver transaminases, they should also be tested and treated.[1][2]

Further studies are required to answer questions such as:[1][2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Kamar N, Bendall R, Legrand-Abravanel F, Xia NS, Ijaz S, Izopet J; et al. (2012). "Hepatitis E." Lancet. 379 (9835): 2477–88. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61849-7. PMID 22549046.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Wedemeyer H, Pischke S, Manns MP (2012). "Pathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis e virus infection". Gastroenterology. 142 (6): 1388–1397.e1. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2012.02.014. PMID 22537448.

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