Descemet's membrane

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Descemet's membrane
Gray871.png
Vertical section of human cornea from near the margin. (Waldeyer.) Magnified.
1. Epithelium.
2. Anterior elastic lamina.
3. substantia propria.
4. Posterior elastic lamina.
5. Endothelium of the anterior chamber.
a. Oblique fibers in the anterior layer of the substantia propria.
b. Lamellæ the fibers of which are cut across, producing a dotted appearance.
c. Corneal corpuscles appearing fusiform in section.
d. Lamellæ the fibers of which are cut longitudinally.
e. Transition to the sclera, with more distinct fibrillation, and surmounted by a thicker epithelium.
f. Small bloodvessels cut across near the margin of the cornea.
Latin l. limitans posterior corneae
Gray's subject #225 1008
Dorlands/Elsevier l_02/12476281

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]


Overview

Descemet's membrane is the basement membrane that lies between the corneal proper substance, also called stroma, and the endothelial layer of the cornea. The endothelial layer is located at the posterior of the cornea. Descemet's membrane, as the basement membrane for the endothelial layer, is secreted by the single layer of cuboidal epithelial cells that compose the endothelial layer of the cornea.

Its thickness ranges from 3 μm at birth to 8-10 μm in adults. [1]

It is also known as the Posterior limiting lamina, posterior elastic lamina, lamina elastica posterior, and membrane of Demours. It was named after French physician Jean Descemet (1732-1810).

See also

References

  1. Johnson DH, Bourne WM, Campbell RJ: The ultrastructure of Descemet's membrane. I. Changes with age in normal cornea. Arch Ophthalmol 100:1942, 1982

External links





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