De Quervain's thyroiditis diagnostic criteria

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De Quervain's thyroiditis Microchapters

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Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating De Quervain's thyroiditis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

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Treatment

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Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Furqan M M. M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

There are no established criteria for the diagnosis of de Quervain's thyroiditis but painful thyroid mass, decreased radioactive iodine uptake, elevated ESR, serum T3, and T4 are helpful in diagnosing de Quervain's thyroiditis.

Diagnostic Criteria

There are no established criteria for the diagnosis of de Quervain's thyroiditis but the following history and lab findings can lead to the diagnosis of de Quervain's thyroiditis.[1]

Stepwise clinical diagnosis of de Quervain's thyroiditis

The following flowchart describes the clinical approach to the diagnosis of de Quervain's thyroiditis.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Neck pain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
No
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RAIU*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Presenting symptoms and TFTs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Increased
 
 
Decreased
 
 
 
 
 
Hyperthyroid
 
 
 
Hypothyroid
 
Euthyroid
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RAIU*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Suppurative thyroiditis
 
 
De Quervain's thyroiditis
 
 
 
Increased
 
Decreased
 
Hashimoto's thyroiditis
 
 
Riedel's thyroiditis††
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grave's disease
 
Silent thyroiditis


Postpartum thyroiditis

‡TFT; Thyroid function tests(TSH, T4, and T3), †Grave's disease is not a thyroiditis, *RAIU; Radioiodine uptake.††One third of Riedel's thyroiditis presents with hypothyroidism.
Table modified from [2]

References

  1. De Groot LJ, Chrousos G, Dungan K, Feingold KR, Grossman A, Hershman JM, Koch C, Korbonits M, McLachlan R, New M, Purnell J, Rebar R, Singer F, Vinik A, Shrestha RT, Hennessey J. "Acute and Subacute, and Riedel's Thyroiditis". PMID 25905408.
  2. "Thyroiditis: Differential Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician".



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