Cytomegalovirus infection historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aravind Kuchkuntla, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

In 1881, Ribbert described the presence of inclusion bodies in the cells in sections of kidney of a still born. In 1960, Thomas H.Weller from Harvard University, coined the term "cytomegalovirus" and isolated the virus from the urine sample of an infant with generalized disease.

Historical Perspective

  • In 1881, Ribbert described the presence of inclusion bodies in the cells in sections of kidney of a still born and he described them as cells similar to protozoan cells with eccentrically placed nuclei and a “central nuclear body” surrounded by clear halo.[1][2]
  • In 1921, Goodpasture and Talbert were the first to suggest that these cell inclusions could be due to a viral agent.[3][4]
  • In 1950, Smith and Vellios reported that infection can occur in-utero.
  • In 1956-57 Weller, Smith and Rowe independently isolated CMV virus and grew it in culture.[5]
  • In 1960, Thomas H.Weller from Harvard University, coined the term "cytomegalovirus" and isolated the virus from the urine sample of an infant with generalized disease.[6]

References

  1. Farber S, Wolbach SB (1932). "Intranuclear and Cytoplasmic Inclusions ("Protozoan-Like Bodies") in the Salivary Glands and Other Organs of Infants". Am J Pathol. 8 (2): 123–136.3. PMC 2062662. PMID 19970004.
  2. Riley HD (1997). "History of the cytomegalovirus". South Med J. 90 (2): 184–90. PMID 9042169.
  3. Ho, Monto (2007). "The history of cytomegalovirus and its diseases". Medical Microbiology and Immunology. 197 (2): 65–73. doi:10.1007/s00430-007-0066-x. ISSN 0300-8584.
  4. WYATT JP, SAXTON J (1950). "Generalized cytomegalic inclusion disease". J Pediatr. 36 (3): 271–94, illust. PMID 15405407.
  5. CRAIG JM, MACAULEY JC, WELLER TH, WIRTH P (1957). "Isolation of intranuclear inclusion producing agents from infants with illnesses resembling cytomegalic inclusion disease". Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 94 (1): 4–12. PMID 13400856.
  6. Weller TH (1970). "Review. Cytomegaloviruses: the difficult years". J Infect Dis. 122 (6): 532–9. PMID 4321292.

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