Second degree AV block historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Elsaiey, MBBCH [2]

Overview

Historical perspective

  • In 1899, Dr. Wenckebach described progressive delay between atrial and ventricular contraction and the eventual failure of a P wave to reach the ventricles.
  • Dr. Mobitz then divided the second degree AV block into two subtypes.
  • In 1905, Dr. John Hay discovered the second degree of AV block.[1]
  • Dr. Hay was examining a patient who complains of slow pulse and dyspnea on exertion for more than 2 years. Dr. Hay noticed the heart rate dropping from 80 beats to 40 beats per minute.
  • Dr. Hay noted the a waves and the arterial pulse to remain stable in the beginning. However, recording pulsation for several times resulted in "a" waves that were not followed by c wave. The a-c jugular wave interval was used as a measurement of AV conduction.
  • Dr. Hay figured out that the pause following a wave was due to failure of ventricular muscles to respond to a stimulus.

References

  1. Upshaw CB, Silverman ME (2000). "John Hay: discoverer of type II atrioventricular block". Clin Cardiol. 23 (11): 869–71. doi:10.1002/clc.4960231118. PMC 6655013 Check |pmc= value (help). PMID 11097138.

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