myGrid

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myGrid is a bioinformatics and eScience research project led by Carole Goble at the University of Manchester. The project brings together several collaborators at the Universities of Southampton, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield, The European Molecular Biology Laboratory-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) in Cambridge, and industrial partners GlaxoSmithKline, Merck KGaA, AstraZeneca, Sun Microsystems, IBM, GeneticXchange, Epistemics and Cerebra , (formerly Network Inference). The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council funded the first phase of the project with £3.5 million, with a further £2 million for phase two supported by the Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute


Overview from grant proposal in 2001

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Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute (OMII)

To date, Grid development has focused on the basic issues of storage, computation and resource management needed to make a global scientific community's information and tools accessible in a high performance environment. However, from an e-Science viewpoint, the purpose of the Grid is to deliver a collaborative and supportive environment that allows geographically distributed scientists to achieve research goals more effectively. MyGrid will design, develop and demonstrate higher level functionalities over an existing Grid infrastructure that support scientists in making use of complex distributed resources. The project has developed an e-Science workbench called Taverna that supports:

  • the scientific process of experimental investigation, evidence accumulation and result assimilation;
  • the scientist's use of the community's information; and
  • scientific collaboration, allowing dynamic groupings to tackle emergent research problems.

The workbench will support individual scientists by providing personalisation facilities relating to resource selection, data management and process enactment. The design and development activity will be informed by and evaluated using problems in bioinformatics, which is characterised by a highly distributed community, with many shared tools resources. myGrid will develop two application environments, one that supports individual scientists in the analysis of functional genomic data, and another that supports the annotation of a pattern database. Both of these tasks require explicit representation and enactment of scientific processes, and have challenging performance requirements.

External links


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