How to edit a page

Revision as of 03:19, 9 October 2007 by C Michael Gibson (Talk | contribs)

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Edit an Existing Page

  1. Type the topic you are interested in in the search box in the left panel of the page.
  2. Clicking Search searches for the keyword that you entered anywhere (not just in the title) on any page.
  3. Clicking Go searches for pages whose exact title matches what you just typed in
  4. Once you have found the topic or page you were looking for, click on the title of the topic (i.e page) you would like to edit
  5. Next, click on the edit button at the top of the page.
  6. Use the basic Wikidoc Syntax instructions at the bottom of each page to learn how to edit. More detailed editing instructions are available on this page.

Editing or contributing to a WikiDoc is an easy process

  • Simply begin by searching the desired topic you would like to edit
  • This will bring you to a new page with a text box containing the editable text of the original page
  • When the page has loaded, click the tab at the top of the page marked 'edit'
  • Also, clicking the edit button in the upper right corner of each section enables an edit page for that particular section
When editing a Wiki Doc, a certain syntax is used. The syntax is referred to as wiki markup.
This syntax is a combination of symbols that act similar to regular keyboard processes.
The markup language used is the same as Wikipedia, which is extensively described there.

Create new articles

WikiDoc articles contain lots of links to other articles. Blue (or purple, if you have already visited them) links represent pages that do exist. Red links (or tan, if you have already visited them) point to pages that don't yet exist. Whoever created these links thought that an article on the topic should exist. If this was not a popular idea, the link may have been removed. It's also possible that a spelling error was made, or that they didn't know the correct name for an existing page on the same (or a more general) topic. In this case, you could fix the link, and/or create a redirect. If you decide there should be an article at the other end of the link, by all means start writing it! To learn more about create a new page by clicking here

Basic wiki language

If you would like to practice the markup, use the SandBox
Try opening the Sandbox in a separate window or tab and keeping this page open for reference.
Editing existing pages is another great way to learn.
Some operations but not all can be performed with the edition buttons edition icons.
By passing your mouse cursor over them, you can read what they do.
This table should be helpful in understanding the markup.
In the left column of the table below, you can see what effects are possible. In the right column, you can see how those effects were achieved.
In other words, to make text look like it looks in the left column, type it in the format you see in the right column.

Examples

What it looks like What you type

Start your sections as follows:

New section

Subsection

Sub-subsection

  • Start with a second-level heading (==); don't use first-level headings (=).
  • Don't skip levels (for example, second-level followed by fourth-level).
  • A Table of Contents will automatically be added to an article that has four or more sections.
  • If appropriate, place subsections in an appropriate order. If listing countries, place them in alphabetical order rather than, say, relative to population of OECD countries, or some random order.
==New section==

===Subsection===

====Sub-subsection====

A single newline generally has no effect on the layout. These can be used to separate sentences within a paragraph. Some editors find that this aids editing and improves the function diff (used internally to compare different versions of a page).

But an empty line starts a new paragraph.

  • When used in a list, a newline does affect the layout (see below).
A single newline
generally has no effect on the layout. 
These can be used to separate
sentences within a paragraph.
Some editors find that this aids editing
and improves the function ''diff'' 
(used internally to compare
different versions of a page).

But an empty line
starts a new paragraph.

You can break lines
without starting a new paragraph.

  • Please use this sparingly.
  • Close markup between lines, do not start a link or italics or bold on one line and close it on the next.
You can break lines<br>
without starting a new paragraph.
  • It's easy to create a list:
    • Start every line with a star (asterisk).
      • More stars means deeper levels.
        • A newline in a list

marks the end of a list item.

  • An empty line starts a new list.
* It's easy to create a list:
** Start every line with a star.
*** More stars means deeper levels.
**** A newline in a list
marks the end of a list item.

* An empty line starts a new list.
  1. Numbered lists are also good
    1. very organized
    2. easy to follow
      1. easier still
# Numbered lists are also good
## very organized
## easy to follow
### easier still
Definition list 
list of definitions
item 
the item's definition
another item
the other item's definition
  • Begin with a semicolon. One item per line; a newline can appear before the colon, but using a space before the colon improves parsing.
; Definition list : list of definitions
; item : the item's definition
; another item
: the other item's definition
  • You can even create mixed lists
    1. and nest them
      • like this
        can I mix definition list as well?
        yes
        how?
        it's easy as
        • a
        • b
        • c
* You can even create mixed lists
*# and nest them
*#* like this
*#*; can I mix definition list as well?
*#*: yes
*#*; how?
*#*: it's easy as
*#*:* a 
*#*:* b
*#*:* c
A colon indents a line or paragraph.

A manual newline starts a new paragraph.

  • This is primarily for displayed material, but is also used for discussion on Talk pages.
: A colon indents a line or paragraph.
A manual newline starts a new paragraph.

When there is a need for separating a block of text

the blockquote command will indent both margins when needed instead of the left margin only as the colon does.

This is useful for (as the name says) inserting blocks of quoted (and cited) text.

<blockquote>
The '''blockquote''' command will indent 
both margins when needed instead of the 
left margin only as the colon does.  
</blockquote>

(See formula on right):

  • This is useful for:
    • pasting preformatted text;
    • algorithm descriptions;
    • program source code;
    • ASCII art;
    • chemical structures;
  • WARNING: If you make it wide, you force the whole page to be wide and hence less readable, especially for people who use lower resolutions. Never start ordinary lines with spaces.
 IF a line starts with a space THEN
 it will be formatted exactly
 as typed;
 in a fixed-width font;
 lines will not wrap;
 ENDIF
Centered text.
  • Please note the American spelling of "center."
<center>Centered text.</center>

A horizontal dividing line: this is above it


and this is below it.

  • Mainly useful for
    • disambiguation - but to be used sparsely, only when separating completely different, unrelated (groups of) meanings
    • separating threads on Talk pages.
A horizontal dividing line:
this is above it
----
and this is below it.



Why redirect a page? Sometimes a topic will have multiple names or abbreviations, and you will want to direct them all to one page

For example take the page ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction. The names STEMI, MI, Acute MI, Myocardial Infarction, AMI all are redirected to the page ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

How to make a redirect (redirect command)

To redirect a page A to a different page B (also called target page), enter the following redirecting command at the top of redirecting page.

#REDIRECT [[NAME OF PAGE B]]

For example, to redirect the MI page ( redirecting page ) to the ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction page (target page), edit the MI page and enter:

#REDIRECT [[ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction]]

What if I misspell the name of a page that I create

If a spelling mistake occurs in a title such as STElevation Myocardial Infarction, it is not possible for a regular user to move the page with all its history. It is however possible to create a redirect. A new page ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction must be created first, and the contents from the old page must be copied manually. Then the old page STElevation Myocardial Infarction must be edited and its source code replaced by:

#REDIRECT [[ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (Acute MI)]]

Undesirable redirects

Don't make (a redirect that points to another redirect); they don't work, they create slow, unpleasant experiences for the reader, and they make the navigational structure of the site confusing.

To learn more about redirects click here.

How Do I Change the Color of a Font?

Typing this:

<font color="red">your text</font>

Yields this red text:

your text

Are there other colors? You can create text in any hexadecimal color.

Typing this:

<font color="#1f4099">your text</font>

Creates your text with hexadecimal color #1f4099:

your text

How Do I Change the Size of a Font?

The fonts come in sizes from 1 to 7. The standard size is 3, unless otherwise specified in the <body> or other tags.

Typing this:

<font size="4">your text</font>

Creates a bigger font size of size 4:

your text

Typing this:

<font size="+1">your text</font>

Creates text with size 1 bigger than the standard:

your text

Typing this:

<font size="-1">your text</font>

Creates text with size 1 smaller than the standard:

your text

5. text makes text with Courier font.</nowiki>

How Do I Insert an Image?

Let's assume you want to insert an image file (preferably PNG for drawings or JPEG for photos) named myimage.png:

  • Step 1: insert the following code where you want the image to appear:
[[Image:Myimage.png | brief description]]
  • Step 2: preview or save the page, click on the red link that was just created, and upload your image as indicated

Note that the link to the image, like every internal link, is automatically capitalized, i.e. Myimage.png instead of myimage.png).

How Do I Insert a Reference?

WikiDoc asks that you use the following syntax for references. This will allow readers to follow a link and view the abstract and potentially the full text in PubMed. It is quite simple to do. It is like having your own mini bibliography manager! For instance, if you move the text, the references will be renumbered as well!

Example:

Say you want the following PubMed reference to appear:

Reference1.png

Copy the PubMed ID from the PubMed page (in this case the PubMed ID is 15541835) and insert the ID in the bibliography section like this:

<biblio>
#gibsonref1 pmid=15541835 This is free space so that you can describe the reference if you want
</biblio>

The part of this that says gibsonref1 is a label. It cannot contain spaces, but otherwise it will say whatever you want. This is a tag you will use to refer to the reference in your text.

On the page, the bibliography will be rendered like this:

<biblio>

  1. gibsonref1 pmid=15541835 sample gibson reference

</biblio>


Typing <cite>gibsonref1</cite> in your text will create a link to this reference for you, assign the reference a number like this: gibsonref1.

Multiple references, <cite>gibsonref2 otherreference<cite>, will be rendered like that: gibson_tmpg otherreference.

The numbers link to the bibliography section, which looks like this:


<biblio>

  1. notcited This reference is not cited, so it appears at the end of the list
  2. otherreference This is another free entry, which is cited
  3. gibsonref1 pmid=15541835 sample gibson reference
  4. gibson_tmpg pmid=12913404 Gibson article about TIMI Myocardial Perfusion

</biblio>


Note that, in the raw code of the bibliography section, the references can appear in any order and can contain notes that are not displayed on the active page. This is what the raw code of the bibliography section looks like:

<biblio>
#notcited This entry is not cited, so it appears at the end of the list
#otherreference This is another free entry, which is cited
#gibsonref1 pmid=15541835 sample gibson reference
#gibson_tmpg pmid=12784359 Gibson article about TIMI Myocardial Perfusion
</biblio>


Categories

At some point it becomes useful to classify the information according to categories. An example of a category in use is this Help page (see link at the very bottom). To create a category, simply add (for each category) a line as follows:

 [[Category: Name of Category]] 

It is convention to insert these lines near the bottom of the wiki page. Once your edit is saved, the category will exist and add the page to it.

Table of Contents

You add the text __NOTOC__ somewhere within the page (it can be added to the bottom of the page) in order to remove the table of contents.

Typing “__TOC__” will put a table of contents in the location of the text.

Inserting Files to be Downloadable by Others

How Do I Upload a File to the Site so it can be Downloaded by Others?

Click on upload file on the toolbox menu to upload the file from your computer.

How Do I Create a Link to the File I Just Uploaded:

Put two square brackets on either side of the file's name to create a link to it so that it can be downloaded like this: [[whatever filename you give to the file]]

Example: You have uploaded a file named DSMB charter.doc. To create the link, you simply type: [[DSMB charter.doc]]

How to Edit the Left Sidebar

In the search box type:

mediawiki:sidebar

How to Create a Link Straight to a Picture

Use the following syntax:

{{filepath|name_of_file.jpg|some text that you want to appear}}



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