Vegetarian cuisine

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File:Vegetarian diet.jpg
A variety of vegetarian food ingredients.

Vegetarian cuisine refers to food that meets vegetarian standards by excluding meat and animal tissue products. For lacto-ovo vegetarianism (the most common type of vegetarianism in the Western world), dairy products such as eggs, milk, and cheese are permitted. The strictest form of vegetarianism is veganism, which excludes all animal products, including dairy products as well as honey, and even some refined sugars if filtered and whitened with bone char.

Vegetarian foods can be classified into two different types:

Foods used in vegetarian cuisine

Food usually regarded as suitable for all types of the vegetarian cuisine usually include:

Cuisine that is traditionally vegetarian

These are some of the most common dishes that vegetarians eat without substitution of ingredients. Such dishes include, from breakfasts to dinnertime desserts:

National cuisines

File:Stuffed mushrooms with spiced quinoa.JPG
Mushrooms stuffed with spiced quinoa.

Desserts

Cuisine that uses meat analogues

These are vegetarian versions of popular dishes that non-vegetarians enjoy and are frequently consumed as fast food, comfort food, transition food for new vegetarians, or a way to show non-vegetarians that they can be vegetarians while still enjoying their favorite foods. Many vegetarians just enjoy these dishes as part of a varied diet.

Some popular mock-meat dishes include:

  • Veggie burgers (burgers usually made from grains, TVP, seitan (wheat gluten), tempeh, and/or mushrooms)
    • In some cases, one can order a burger made without any mock-meat at all, see: "burgerless burger"
  • Veggie dogs (usually made from TVP)
  • Imitation sausage (soysage, various types of 'salami', 'bologna', 'pepperoni', et al., made of some form of soy)
  • Mockmeat or 'meatyballs' (usually made from TVP)
  • Vegetarian or meatless 'chicken' (usually made from seitan, tofu or TVP)
  • Jambalaya (with mock sausage and mock chicken, usually made from TVP, seitan, or tempeh)
  • Tomato Omelette where tomatoes and a paste of flour is used to produce a vegetable omelette without the use of eggs.
  • Scrambled eggs where tofu is mashed and fried with spices (often including tumeric, for its strong yellow color) to produce a dish that is often nearly indistinguishable from eggs.

Mycoprotein is another common base for mock-meats, and vegetarian flavorings are added to these bases, such as sea vegetables for a seafood taste.

Note that choa tofu and tempeh are components in certain cuisines in their own right, and do not necessarily take the place of meat.

See also

== External links ==

de:Vegetarische Küche

Template:Vegetarianism


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