Temporal arteritis laboratory findings

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Hamid Qazi, MD, BSc [2]

Overview

The sedimentation rate is very high in most of the patients, but may be normal in approximately 20% of the cases. An elevated concentration of blood erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is suggestive of temporal arteritis. Laboratory findings consistent with the diagnosis of temporal arteritis include normochromic anemia, deceased albumin level, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and elevated C-reactive protein. Some patients with temporal arteritis may have elevated concentration of interleukin-6, which is usually suggestive of progression.

Laboratory Findings

References

  1. Liu NH, LaBree LD, Feldon SE, Rao NA (2001). "The epidemiology of giant cell arteritis : a 12-year retrospective study". Ophthalmology. 108 (6): 1145–9. PMID 11382644.
  2. Wein FB, Miller NR (2000). "Unilateral central retinal artery occlusion followed by contralateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in giant cell arteritis". Retina. 20 (3): 301–3. PMID 10872938.
  3. Al-Abdulla NA, Kelley JS, Green WR, Miller NR (2003). "Herpes zoster vasculitis presenting as giant cell arteritis with choroidal infarction". Retina. 23 (4): 567–9. PMID 12972779.
  4. Foroozan R, Buono LM, Savino PJ, Sergott RC (2003). "Tonic pupils from giant cell arteritis". Br J Ophthalmol. 87 (4): 510–2. PMC 1771609. PMID 12642330.
  5. Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Clark, Tiffany M.; Hoffman, Gary S. (2009). "Takayasu Arteritis and Giant Cell Arteritis". Medicine. 88 (4): 221–226. doi:10.1097/MD.0b013e3181af70c1. ISSN 0025-7974.



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