Temporal arteritis history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Hamid Qazi, MD, BSc [2]

Overview

The hallmark of temporal arteritis is a headache. The most common symptoms of temporal arteritis include headache, jaw claudication, and fatigue. Common symptoms of temporal arteritis include visual symptoms, jaw claudication, headache, fatigue, and neck, shoulder, pelvic girdle pain. Less common symptoms of temporal arteritis include limb claudication, TIA, stroke, facial pain, bleeding gums, mouth sores, and joint pains.

History and Symptoms

This diagnosis should be considered in any patient over the age of 50 with the new onset of headache, particularly if the erythrocyte sedimentation rate is elevated.

The hallmark of temporal arteritis is a headache. The most common symptoms of temporal arteritis include headache, jaw claudication, and fatigue.

History

Patients with temporal arteritis may have a positive history of:[1][2][3]

Common Symptoms

Patients present with:[4][5]

Less Common Symptoms

Other symptoms that may occur with this disease:[5]

References

  1. Dasgupta, B.; Borg, F. A.; Hassan, N.; Alexander, L.; Barraclough, K.; Bourke, B.; Fulcher, J.; Hollywood, J.; Hutchings, A.; James, P.; Kyle, V.; Nott, J.; Power, M.; Samanta, A. (2010). "BSR and BHPR guidelines for the management of giant cell arteritis". Rheumatology. 49 (8): 1594–1597. doi:10.1093/rheumatology/keq039a. ISSN 1462-0324.
  2. Bhatti MT, Tabandeh H (2001). "Giant cell arteritis: diagnosis and management". Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 12 (6): 393–9. PMID 11734678.
  3. Kuo, Chih-Hung; McCluskey, Peter; Fraser, Clare L. (2016). "Chewing Gum Test for Jaw Claudication in Giant-Cell Arteritis". New England Journal of Medicine. 374 (18): 1794–1795. doi:10.1056/NEJMc1511420. ISSN 0028-4793.
  4. Hunder GG, Bloch DA, Michel BA, Stevens MB, Arend WP, Calabrese LH; et al. (1990). "The American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for the classification of giant cell arteritis". Arthritis Rheum. 33 (8): 1122–8. PMID 2202311.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Nesher G, Nesher R, Rozenman Y, Sonnenblick M (2001). "Visual hallucinations in giant cell arteritis: association with visual loss". J Rheumatol. 28 (9): 2046–8. PMID 11550973.



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