Splenic infarction overview

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Differentiating Splenic Infarction from other Diseases

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Asiri Ediriwickrema, M.D., M.H.S. [2]

Overview

A splenic infarct occurs when the vascular supply for the spleen becomes occluded leading to tissue hypoxia and necrosis. It can be the result of either arterial or venous compromise, and it is associated with multiple of disease states. The most common etiologies include malignancy, hypercoagulable disorders, and embolic disorders.[1][2] It is also common that splenic infarctions are the presenting signs of a previously unknown condition.[3] Patients can be asymptomatic, however, most develop left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Splenic infarction is often diagnosed with computed tomography. Splenic infarcts can be managed medically, however, surgical intervention is indicated if the patient develops complications including hemorrhage, rupture, abscess, or pseudocyst.[4]

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Splenic infarction overview from Other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Natural History

Complications

Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Prevention

References

  1. Splenic infarction. Radiopedia.org (2015-2016). http://radiopaedia.org/articles/splenic-infarction Accessed on August 27, 2016
  2. Antopolsky M, Hiller N, Salameh S, Goldshtein B, Stalnikowicz R (2009). "Splenic infarction: 10 years of experience". Am J Emerg Med. 27 (3): 262–5. doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2008.02.014. PMID 19328367.
  3. Lawrence YR, Pokroy R, Berlowitz D, Aharoni D, Hain D, Breuer GS (2010). "Splenic infarction: an update on William Osler's observations". Isr Med Assoc J. 12 (6): 362–5. PMID 20928991.
  4. Jaroch MT, Broughan TA, Hermann RE (1986). "The natural history of splenic infarction". Surgery. 100 (4): 743–50. PMID 3764696. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

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