Short bowel syndrome secondary prevention

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sadaf Sharfaei M.D.[2]

Overview

There are several ways to prevent complications of short bowel syndrome. Management strategies and regular follow-up are needed to find and treat complications accordingly. Effective measures must be adopted for secondary prevention of complications following total parenteral nutrition including liver disease, cholelithiasis, kidney stone, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, lactic acidosis, lactic acidosis. Hydration, consumption of supplements, antibiotic therapy, and regular monitoring with blood tests, ultrasound and scans are recommended.

Secondary Prevention

There are several ways to prevent complications of short bowel syndrome:

  • Management strategies and regular follow-up are needed to find and treat complications accordingly.

Effective measures

Follow-up

  • Close long-term follow-up is needed.
  • Monitoring and measuring blood levels of nutrients are required.[2]

Table below summarizes the tests and imaging studies which are required in patients with short bowel syndrome when discharge from the hospital.

Measurement Frequency
Clinic visit Every 6 to 12 months
Weight Every week to check for malnutrition and dehydration
Intake and output Every 1 to 4 weeks to check for malnutrition and dehydration
Comprehensive metabolic panel including magnesium Every 4 weeks to check for malnutrition and dehydration
Essential fatty acids Every 6 to 12 months to check for malnutrition
Vitamin levels Every 6 to 12 months to check for malnutrition
Minerals Every 6 to 12 months to check for malnutrition
Liver function tests Every 6 months to check for liver disease
Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan   Every 2 years to check for osteoporosis

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Rodrigues, Gabriel; Seetharam, Prasad (2011). "Short bowel syndrome: A review of management options". Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology. 17 (4): 229. doi:10.4103/1319-3767.82573. ISSN 1319-3767.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Wilmore, Douglas W.; Robinson, Malcolm K. (2014). "Short Bowel Syndrome". World Journal of Surgery. 24 (12): 1486–1492. doi:10.1007/s002680010266. ISSN 0364-2313.


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