Pulmonary embolism cost-effectiveness of therapy

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Editor(s)-In-Chief: The APEX Trial Investigators, C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rim Halaby, M.D. [2]

Overview

When indicated, early discharge and outpatient treatment for pulmonary embolism is more cost effective than inpatient treatment.[1] The inpatient treatment with low molecular weight heparin has been reported to be more cost effective than that with unfractionated heparin.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Aujesky D, Smith KJ, Cornuz J, Roberts MS (2005). "Cost-effectiveness of low-molecular-weight heparin for treatment of pulmonary embolism". Chest. 128 (3): 1601–10. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1601. PMID 16162764.



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