Procerus muscle

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Procerus
Muscles of the head, face, and neck. (Procerus visible at upper left, at top of nose.)
Latin musculus procerus, pyramidalis nasi, depressor glabellae
Gray's subject #107 382
Origin: From fascia over the lower of the nasal bone
Insertion: Into the skin of the lower part of the forehead between the eyebrows
Artery:
Nerve: Zygomatic branch of the facial nerve
Action: Draws down the medial angle of the eyebrow giving expressions of frowning
Dorlands/Elsevier m_22/12550241

The Procerus is a small pyramidal slip of muscle deep to the superior orbital nerve, artery and vein.

Origin and insertion

It arises by tendinous fibers from the fascia covering the lower part of the nasal bone and upper part of the lateral nasal cartilage.

It is inserted into the skin over the lower part of the forehead between the two eyebrows, its fibers decussating with those of the Frontalis.

Function

It helps to pull that part of the skin between the eyebrows downwards, which assists in flaring the nostrils.

It can also contribute to an expression of anger.

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.

hu:Musculus pyramidalis nasi sr:Танки мишић


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