Polyamide

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A polyamide is a polymer containing monomers joined by peptide bonds. They can occur both naturally, examples being proteins, such as wool and silk, and can be made artificially, examples being Nylons, Aramids, and sodium poly(aspartate).

Production from monomers

The amide link is produced from the condensation reaction of an amino group and a carboxylic acid or acid chloride group. A small molecule, usually water, ammonia or hydrogen chloride, is eliminated.

The amino group and the carboxylic acid group can be on the same monomer, or the polymer can be constituted of two different bifunctional monomers, one with two amino groups, the other with two carboxylic acid or acid chloride groups.

Amino Acids can be taken as examples of single monomer (if the difference between R groups is ignored) reacting with identical molecules to form a polyamide:

File:2-amino-acidsb.png
The reaction of two amino acids. Many of these reactions produce long chain proteins

Aramid (pictured below) is made from two different monomers which continuously alternate to form the polymer and is an aromatic polyamide:

File:Kelvar reaction.png
The reaction of 1,4-phenyl-diamine (para-phenylenediamine) and terephthaloyl chloride to produce Aramid

ca:Poliamida cs:Polyamidová vlákna de:Polyamid fi:Polyamidi sv:Polyamid nl:Polyamide


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