Pharyngitis pathophysiology

Jump to: navigation, search

Pharyngitis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Pharyngitis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

Ultrasound

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Pharyngitis pathophysiology On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Pharyngitis pathophysiology

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Pharyngitis pathophysiology

CDC on Pharyngitis pathophysiology

Pharyngitis pathophysiology in the news

Blogs on Pharyngitis pathophysiology

Directions to Hospitals Treating Type page name here

Risk calculators and risk factors for Pharyngitis pathophysiology

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Venkata Sivakrishna Kumar Pulivarthi M.B.B.S [2]

Overview

The pathogenesis of the sore throat due to pharyngitis is poorly understood.[1] The pharynx is often the first site of infection for many contagious diseases such as pharyngitis because pathogens such as viruses and bacteria often settle in the nasopharynx though inhalation or through droplets. Viral pharyngitis usually transmit from person to person through direct touch or through droplets transmission.[2] The foreign invader reproduces rapidly after settling on the nasopharynx. Generally pharyngitis is a primary disease, but may be associated with systemic disorders such as the acute retroviral syndrome, or part of a more generalized upper respiratory tract infection.[3]

Pathophysiology

References

  1. Ferri, Fred (2005). Md consult/first consult 14-month subscription : combo retail pack. Place of publication not identified: Elsevier Saunders. ISBN 9781416026075.
  2. Kline JA, Runge JW (1994) Streptococcal pharyngitis: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. J Emerg Med 12 (5):665-80. PMID: 7989695
  3. Bennett, John (2015). Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's principles and practice of infectious diseases. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Saunders. ISBN 978-1455748013.
  4. Tsai HP, Kuo PH, Liu CC, Wang JR (2001). "Respiratory viral infections among pediatric inpatients and outpatients in Taiwan from 1997 to 1999". J Clin Microbiol. 39 (1): 111–8. doi:10.1128/JCM.39.1.111-118.2001. PMC 87689. PMID 11136758.
  5. Proud D, Naclerio RM, Gwaltney JM, Hendley JO (1990) Kinins are generated in nasal secretions during natural rhinovirus colds. J Infect Dis 161 (1):120-3. PMID: 2295843
  6. Anjos LM, Marcondes MB, Lima MF, Mondelli AL, Okoshi MP (2014) Streptococcal acute pharyngitis. Rev Soc Bras Med Trop 47 (4):409-13. PMID: 25229278
  7. Murray RC, Chennupati SK (2012) Chronic streptococcal and non-streptococcal pharyngitis. Infect Disord Drug Targets 12 (4):281-5. PMID: 22338589

Linked-in.jpg