Organocopper compound

Jump to: navigation, search

Organocopper compounds in organometallic chemistry contain carbon to copper chemical bonds. Organocopper chemistry is the science of organocopper compounds describing their physical properties, synthesis and reactions.[1][2][3] They are reagents in organic chemistry.

Brief history

The first organocopper compound, the explosive dicopper acetylide Cu2C2 was synthesized by Bottger in 1859. Henry Gilman prepared methylcopper in 1936. In 1941 Kharash discovered that reaction of a Grignard reagent with cyclohexenone in presence of Cu(I) resulted in 1,4-addition instead of 1,2-addition. In 1952 Gilman investigated for the first time dialkylcuprates.

Properties

Organocopper compounds are very reactive towards oxygen and water forming copper(I) oxide, tend to be thermally unstable and are generally insoluble in inert solvents. They are therefore difficult to handle and of little practical value. On the other hand organocopper reagents are used very frequently in organic chemistry as alkylating reagents prepared in situ in an inert environment with in general more functional group tolerance than corresponding Grignards or organolithium reagents. The electronegativity of copper is much higher than its next-door neighbour in the group 12 elements, zinc, suggesting less nucleophilicity for carbon.

Copper belongs to the group of coinage metals together with silver and gold and their chemistries have many similarities. The oxidation state can be +1 or +2 and intermediates can have oxidation state +3. Monovalent alkylcopper compounds (R-Cu) form divalent cuprates R2CuLi with organolithium compounds (R-Li) now known as Gilman reagents. Organocopper compounds can be stabilized with organophosphanes (R3P).

The cuprates have complex aggregation states in crystalline form and in solution. Lithium dimethylcuprate is a dimer in diethyl ether forming an 8-membered ring with two lithium atoms coordinating between two methyl groups.

Organocopper aggregates

The first ever crystal structure was determined in 1972 by Lappert for CuCH2SiMe3. This compound is relatively stable because the bulky trimethylsilyl groups provide steric protection. It is a tetramer forming an 8-membered ring with alternating Cu-C bonds. In addition the four copper atoms form a planar Cu4 ring based on three-center two-electron bonds. The copper to copper bond length is 242 pm compared to 256 pm in bulk copper. In pentamesitylpentacopper a 5-membered copper ring is formed and pentafluorophenylcopper is a tetramer.[4]

With carbon monoxide copper forms a non-classical metal carbonyl.

Cu(III) intermediates

In many organometallic reactions involving copper, the reaction mechanism invokes a copper intermediate with oxidation state +3 for instance in reductive elimination processes to Cu(I). However Cu(III) compounds are rare in chemistry in general and until recently organocopper(III) species have been elusive. In 2007 the first spectroscopic evidence was obtained for the involvement of Cu(III) in the conjugate addition of the Gilman reagent to an enone [5]:

A Cu(III) intermediate characterized by NMR Bertz 2007

In a so-called rapid-injection NMR experiment at -100°C, the Gilman reagent Me2CuLi (stabilized by lithium iodide) was introduced to cyclohexenone (1) enabling the detection of the copper - alkene pi complex 2. On subsequent addition of trimethylsilyl cyanide the Cu(III) species 3 is formed (indefinitely stable at that temperature) and on increasing the temperature to -80°C the conjugate addition product 4. According to an accompanying in silico experiments [6] the Cu(III) intermediate has a square planar molecular geometry with the cyano group in cis orientation with respect to the cyclohexenyl methine group and anti-parallel to the methine proton. With other ligands than the cyano group this study predicts room temperature stable Cu(III) compounds.

Synthesis

Reactions

Organocopper reactions are classified in a number of reaction types:

Organocopper Nucleophilic Substitution
Many electrophiles will do with an approximate order of reactivity acid chlorides[7] > aldehydes > tosylates ~ epoxides > iodides > bromides > chlorides > ketones > esters > nitriles >> alkenes
Decarboxylative Aryl Aryl Coupling
Addition of methylmagnesium bromide to isophorone Kharasch 1941
Without added salt the main products are alcohol B (42%) from nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group and diene C (48%) as its dehydration reaction product. With added salt the main product is 1,4-adduct A (82%) with some C (7%).

See also

  • Chemistries of carbon with other elements of the periodic table:
CH He
CLi CBe CB CC CN CO CF Ne
CNa CMg CAl CSi CP CS CCl Ar
CK CCa CSc CTi CV CCr CMn CFe CCo CNi CCu CZn CGa CGe CAs CSe CBr Kr
CRb CSr CY CZr CNb CMo CTc CRu CRh CPd CAg CCd CIn CSn CSb CTe CI Xe
CCs CBa CHf CTa CW CRe COs CIr CPt CAu CHg CTl CPb CBi CPo CAt Rn
Fr Ra Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Uub Uut Uuq Uup Uuh Uus Uuo
La Ce Pr Nd Pm Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu
Ac Th Pa CU Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No Lr


Chemical bonds to carbon
Core organic chemistry many uses in chemistry.
Academic research, but no widespread use Bond unknown / not assessed.

References

  1. An introduction to synthesis using organocopper reagents Gary H Posner 1980 ISBN 0-471-69538-6
  2. Synthetic Methods of Organometallic and Inorganic Chemistry Vol 5, Copper, Silver, Gold, Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury W.A. Herrmann Ed. ISBN 3-13-103061-5
  3. Organometallics Christoph Elschenbroich 3rd Ed. 2006 ISBN 3-527-29390-6 - Wiley-VCH, Weinheim
  4. Organic Syntheses, Coll. Vol. 6, p.875 (1988); Vol. 59, p.122 (1979) Link
  5. Rapid Injection NMR in Mechanistic Organocopper Chemistry. Preparation of the Elusive Copper(III) Intermediate Steven H. Bertz, Stephen Cope, Michael Murphy, Craig A. Ogle, and Brad J. Taylor J. Am. Chem. Soc.; 2007; 129(23) pp 7208 - 7209; (Communication) doi:10.1021/ja067533d
  6. Organocuprate Conjugate Addition: The Square-Planar "CuIII" Intermediate Haipeng Hu and James P. Snyder J. Am. Chem. Soc.; 2007; 129(23) pp 7210 - 7211;(Communication) doi:10.1021/ja0675346
  7. For an example see: Organic Syntheses, Coll. Vol. 6, p.248 (1988); Vol. 55, p.122 (1976) Link.
  8. Synthesis of Biaryls via Catalytic Decarboxylative Coupling Lukas J. Gooßen, et al. Science 313, 662 (2006) doi:10.1126/science.1128684
  9. Reagents: base potassium carbonate, solvent NMP, catalysts palladium acetylacetonate, Copper(I) iodide, MS stands for molecular sieves, ligand phenanthroline
  10. For an example: Organic Syntheses, Coll. Vol. 9, p.328 (1998); Vol. 72, p.135 (1995) Link.
  11. Eiichi Nakamura, Seiji Mori, Wherefore art thou Copper? Structures and Reaction Mechanisms of Organocuprate Clusters in Organic Chemistry, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39, 3750-3771 (2000).
  12. Factors Determining the Course and Mechanisms of Grignard Reactions. II. The Effect of Metallic Compounds on the Reaction between Isophorone and Methylmagnesium bromide M. S. Kharasch, P. O. Tawney J. Am. Chem. Soc.; 1941; 63(9); 2308-2316. doi:10.1021/ja01854a005
  13. For an example: Organic Syntheses, Coll. Vol. 7, p.236 (1990); Vol. 64, p.1 (1986) Link

de:Organische Kupferverbindungen



Linked-in.jpg