Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

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Nephrotic Syndrome Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yazan Daaboul, Serge Korjian, Mehrian Jafarizade, M.D [2]

Overview

Ultrasound-guided renal biopsy for visualization under light microscopy, immunofluorescence or immunoperoxidase, and electron microscopy is usually recommended for patients with nephrotic syndrome.[1] Renal biopsy provides diagnostic and prognostic benefit. However, guidelines that define the timing and the circumstances to perform renal biopsy are not present. In minimal change disease, the most common primary cause of nephrotic syndrome in children, and in diabetic nephropathy, the most common secondary cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, renal biopsy is not generally recommended and is not routinely performed.[2] Nonetheless, patients who present with unknown or unsure etiology of nephrotic syndrome are recommended to undergo renal biopsy for definitive diagnosis.[2]

Nephrotic Syndrome Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Nephrotic syndrome from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X-Ray

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

CT Scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

CDC on Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies in the news

Blogs on Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

Directions to Hospitals Treating Nephrotic syndrome

Risk calculators and risk factors for Nephrotic syndrome other diagnostic studies

Other diagnostic studies

Biopsy

  • Ultrasound-guided renal biopsy for visualization under light microscopy, immunofluorescence or immunoperoxidase, and electron microscopy is usually recommended for patients with nephrotic syndrome.[1] Renal biopsy provides diagnostic and prognostic benefit. However, guidelines that define the timing and the circumstances to perform renal biopsy are not present. In minimal change disease, the most common primary cause of nephrotic syndrome in children, and in diabetic nephropathy, the most common secondary cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, renal biopsy is not generally recommended and is not routinely performed.[2] Nonetheless, patients who present with unknown or unsure etiology of nephrotic syndrome are recommended to undergo renal biopsy for definitive diagnosis.[2]
  • Kidney biopsy is the gold standard test for the diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome.[3]
  • This method will reveal the exact cause of proteinuria.

Relative contraindications of the kidney biopsy:

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Hull RP, Goldsmith DJ (2008). "Nephrotic syndrome in adults". BMJ. 336 (7654): 1185–9. doi:10.1136/bmj.39576.709711.80. PMC 2394708. PMID 18497417.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Kodner C (2009). "Nephrotic syndrome in adults: diagnosis and management". Am Fam Physician. 80 (10): 1129–34. PMID 19904897.
  3. "Clinical competence in percutaneous renal biopsy. Health and Public Policy Committee. American College of Physicians". Ann. Intern. Med. 108 (2): 301–3. February 1988. PMID 3341661.

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