Mallory-Weiss syndrome pathophysiology

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mohamed Diab, MD [2]

Overview

The exact pathogenesis of Mallory-Weiss syndrome is not fully understood. It is thought that Mallory-Weiss syndrome is the result of sudden increase in intraabdominal pressure that causes mucosal lacerations.

Pathogenesis

  • The exact pathogenesis of Mallory-Weiss syndrome is not fully understood.
  • It is thought that Mallory-Weiss syndrome is the result of sudden increase in intraabdominal pressure that causes mucosal lacerations. If the tear involves the esophageal venous or arterial Plexus,bleeding occurs.[1][2]

Genetics

There are no genes involved in the pathogenesis of Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

Gross Pathology

On gross pathology, Mallory-Weiss tears may appear red longitudinal break in the mucosa, sometimes may extend into muscularis mucosa, and covered by a clot. Active bleeding may also be observed.

References

  1. Byrne, John J.; Moran, John M. (1965). "The Mallory-Weiss Syndrome". New England Journal of Medicine. 272 (8): 398–400. doi:10.1056/NEJM196502252720805. ISSN 0028-4793.
  2. Decker, John P.; Zamcheck, Norman; Mallory, G. Kenneth (1953). "Mallory-Weiss Syndrome". New England Journal of Medicine. 249 (24): 957–963. doi:10.1056/NEJM195312102492401. ISSN 0028-4793.



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