Incision and drainage

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Incision and drainage

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Overview

Incision and drainage and clinical lancing are minor surgical procedures to release pus or pressure built up under the skin, such as from an abscess or boil. It is performed by treating the area with an antiseptic, such as iodine based solution, and then making a small incision to puncture the skin using a sterile instrument such as a sharp needle, a pointed scalpel or a lancet. This allows the pus fluid to escape by draining out through the incision.

Good medical practice for large abdominal abscesses requires insertion of a drainage tube, preceded by insertion of a PICC line to enable readiness of treatment for possible septic shock.

Role of curettage

Linear incision and curettage is an effective as deroofing and drainage in subcutaneous abscess, but incision and curettage heals faster (9 versus 15 days).[1] Curettage is also important in treating pilonidal abscesses.[2]

Adjunct antibiotics

Uncomplicated cutaneous abscesses do not need antibiotics after successful drainage.[3][4][5]

See also

References

  1. Sørensen C, Hjortrup A, Moesgaard F, Lykkegaard-Nielsen M (1987). "Linear incision and curettage vs. deroofing and drainage in subcutaneous abscess. A randomized clinical trial". Acta chirurgica Scandinavica 153 (11-12): 659-60. PMID 3324596.
  2. Vahedian J, Nabavizadeh F, Nakhaee N, Vahedian M, Sadeghpour A (2005). "Comparison between drainage and curettage in the treatment of acute pilonidal abscess". Saudi medical journal 26 (4): 553-5. PMID 15900358.
  3. Macfie J, Harvey J (1977). "The treatment of acute superficial abscesses: a prospective clinical trial". The British journal of surgery 64 (4): 264-6. PMID 322789.
  4. Llera JL, Levy RC (1985). "Treatment of cutaneous abscess: a double-blind clinical study". Annals of emergency medicine 14 (1): 15-9. PMID 3880635.
  5. Lee MC, Rios AM, Aten MF, et al (2004). "Management and outcome of children with skin and soft tissue abscesses caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus". Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. 23 (2): 123-7. doi:10.1097/01.inf.0000109288.06912.21. PMID 14872177.
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