HIV AIDS CT

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [2]; Associate Editors-in-Chief: Ujjwal Rastogi, MBBS; Ammu Susheela, M.D. [3]

Overview

CT scans of chest are an important part of the work-up of HIV patients presenting with pulmonary symptoms. CT scans may show similar findings observed on chest X-rays but carry the advantage of having greater sensitivity in the detection of early interstitial lung disease, lymphadenopathy, and pulmonary nodules.

CT

Chest CT

CT scans of chest are an important part of the work-up of HIV patients presenting with pulmonary symptoms. A chest CT scan should be obtained when chest X-rays are unclear or inconclusive. A CT scan is particularly useful in characterizing pulmonary nodules that may result from infections (bacterial or fungal pneumonia, mycobacterial disease) or malignancy (lymphoma, metastasis). CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy is used to make a definitive diagnosis.[1]

Coronal chest CT cut of an individual with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia
Image courtesy of Dr Paresh K Desai , Radiopedia. (original file [1] Creative Commons BY-SA-NC

References

  1. Allen CM, Al-Jahdali HH, Irion KL, Al Ghanem S, Gouda A, Khan AN (2010). "Imaging lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS.". Ann Thorac Med. 5 (4): 201–16. PMC 2954374Freely accessible. PMID 20981180. doi:10.4103/1817-1737.69106. 

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