Glucogenic amino acid

Jump to: navigation, search

A glucogenic amino acid is an amino acid that can be converted into glucose through gluconeogenesis.[1][2] This is in contrast to the ketogenic amino acids that are converted into ketone bodies.

In humans, the glucogenic amino acids are - glycine, serine, threonine, valine, histidine, arginine, cysteine, proline, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, asparagine and methionine, whereas isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan can be either glucogenic or ketogenic.

See also

References

  1. Brosnan J (2003). "Interorgan amino acid transport and its regulation". J Nutr. 133 (6 Suppl 1): 2068S–2072S. PMID 12771367. 
  2. Young V, Ajami A (2001). "Glutamine: the emperor or his clothes?". J Nutr. 131 (9 Suppl): 2449S–59S; discussion 2486S–7S. PMID 11533293. 

External links


<tr bgcolor="#ccccff"><td colspan="3" align="center">
v  d  e
Major families of biochemicals</td></tr><tr><td colspan="3" style="text-align: center;">Peptides | Amino acids | Nucleic acids | Carbohydrates | Nucleotide sugars | Lipids | Terpenes | Carotenoids | Tetrapyrroles | Enzyme cofactors | Steroids | Flavonoids | Alkaloids | Polyketides | Glycosides</td></tr><tr bgcolor="pink"><td style="white-space: nowrap; width: 10%; color: pink;">Analogues of nucleic acids:</td><td align="center">The 20 Common Amino Acids ("dp" = data page)</td><td style="white-space: nowrap; width: 10%; color: pink;">Analogues of nucleic acids:</td></tr>
Alanine (dp) | Arginine (dp) | Asparagine (dp) | Aspartic acid (dp) | Cysteine (dp) | Glutamic acid (dp) | Glutamine (dp) | Glycine (dp) | Histidine (dp) | Isoleucine (dp) | Leucine (dp) | Lysine (dp) | Methionine (dp) | Phenylalanine (dp) | Proline (dp) | Serine (dp) | Threonine (dp) | Tryptophan (dp) | Tyrosine (dp) | Valine (dp)


fi:Glukogeeninen aminohappo

Linked-in.jpg