Hippocratic face

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Hippocratic face

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]


The Hippocratic face (facies Hippocratica in Latin) is the change produced in the countenance by death [1] or long sickness, excessive evacuations, excessive hunger, and the like.

The nose is pinched, the eyes are sunken, the temples hollow, the ears cold and retracted, the skin of the forehead tense and dry, the complexion livid, the lips pendent, relaxed, and cold.

The Hippocratic face is so called because it was first described by Hippocrates.

A related term is cachexia.

References

  1. "Dorlands Medical Dictionary:hippocratic facies".

Additional Resource

Based on an entry in the public domain 1913 Webster Dictionary.




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